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Found 10 results

  1. I flew helicopters in the Army decades ago, and got have my Commercial, Instrument, Single Engine, Land Rotary Wing ticket. I'm not current, and haven't been for years. (renting helos is big bucks!). Can't really see flying a helicopter ever again, and I've never flown a fixed wing. Questions on getting the Part 107 cert (opinions and legalities both welcome): Do I just start over as if I didn't already have an FAA cert? Do I get a Sport Pilot rating and go from there? (I wouldn't mind getting the rating, but time and cost is a factor). Other options? Any advice or suggestions welcome.
  2. It's been all over the news today and blowing up on Twitter. Figured I'd post it here. Appeals Court Strikes Down FAA Drone Registration Rule
  3. My name is Frank Cohen and I am a new member to this forum. Just passed my part 107 and waiting for my certificate. Have a P4P right now but ordered a Matrice 210 with XTR and Z30. Looking to start doing contract work as a pilot for established companies. Feel free to contact me if you are interested in flying in the Tampa, FL area.
  4. Have you flown your UAV overseas? Do you have any experiences in a foreign country? Have you looked at drone regs in other countries? Why not share some of that here with some facts for us.
  5. Hey all, Something I've been wondering about. Now that the new Part 107 rules are in effect, do companies with 333 exemptions have to file for waivers like Part 107 pilots do? If not, how long does their exemption last? And can it be renewed? Chris
  6. On Oct 3, almost 4 months ago, I sent an email to the ATL FSDO as follows. " I currently hold a Part 107 remote pilot certificate (temporary). Obviously, if I am operating a sUAV commercially I must abide by the Part 107 regulations. However, if I am operating recreationally am I bound by the hobbyist guidelines or must I always operate under the Part 107 regulations?" I never got a reply and had given up. Today I got an email saying they have been having email problems and to call if I still needed assistance. At first I thought why bother since I will most likely get a recording or no human. Man, was I wrong. Got a guy who really knows his UAV stuff and while some may feel that the answer was obvious, I wanted to be certain. Yes, I can have the best of both worlds is the bottom line. However, as an inspector he suggested that a copy of those community based guidelines be included in the manual that I keep handy in case of an inspection. So for those that are AMA members (I need to re-join) for example, have all that info handy if operating non-commercially in controlled airspace and after proper notification has been provided to Airport management and local tower, if there is one. He also emphasized that you do not need permission, you simply must notify. The good news is that I can now fly from my front lawn!
  7. Are you thinking about becoming a commercial UAV pilot under FAA part 107? If so, UAV insurance should be a main concern of your new business. A vast majority of "standard" liability insurance policies exclude anything that has to do with aircraft. Since UAVs are under the purview of the FAA, they are considered to be aircraft by most insurers. So how do you get your new UAV operation insured? Easy, contact an aviation specific insurance broker (I happen to be one). If this sounds intimating, you are not alone. However, once you understand the basics of insuring an aircraft, you will be an aviation insurance wizard. The base policy in the aviation insurance industry is liability only. The limits on liability only policies range from $500,000 each occurrence all the way up to $5,000,000 each occurrence. However, if higher limits are needed, they can be negotiated. This liability coverage will protect you from any Bodily Injury or Property Damage claims that may arise from your operation of your insured UAV(s). Fly through a window while shooting a real estate video and land on somebody's grand piano? Covered. Hit a passerby and cut their finger? Covered. After you have purchased liability coverage, and are looking for more protection, you can then add "hull" coverage to your policy with some of the aviation insurance companies. Hull coverage is physical damage to your UAV itself. This is a "Stated" or "Agreed" value. Let us say you have a basic DJI Phantom 3 Professional that you have insured for $1000. You slam this aircraft into a tree and completely destroy it. The insurance company takes a look, sees that it will not be feasible to repair it, and they deem it a total loss. In this scenario, you would get a check for $1000 minus any applicable deductibles ( UAV deductibles are usually 5% - 10% of the insured value of the aircraft). Same logic applies to any other UAV. However, if you have an inspire 1, with a very expensive upgraded camera, you would want to "schedule" the aircraft and the camera separately. The upgraded camera can be added to most UAV insurance policies as "payload" equipment. Liability and Hull coverage are the main coverages that you should be concerned with as a commercial UAV operator. There are some other "ancillary" coverages that I will address in future posts. Thanks, Joe Ernster Bullock Agency, Inc. joe@bullockagency.com
  8. I have been searching and if I am interpreting my data correctly I found that If I am a recreational user I “can” fly at night and if I have my P107 I can not unless I get a wavier and have anti-collision lighting system visible up to 3SM. I see nothing on the FAA website that prohibits flying at night except under the Part 107 section. I went through the special rule for model aircraft and found nothing pertaining to this. How can the FAA not let trained UAS pilots fly at night but little jimmy can do whatever he wants? The AMA mentions a lighting system but that is strictly to see the aircraft in the dark. Not for anti-collision. Can I fly at night if it is for fun and not for profit? Any insight would be appreciated. Marcel
  9. Hi all, I'm proud (and nervous and excited) to share a new training course I've been working on. It's called Drone Pilot Ground School, and it'll soon become our flagship training course for commercial drone operators in the United States. As the FAA regulations mature and Part 107 replaces the Section 333 Exemption for the vast majority of low-risk sUAS flight operations, our team looks at Drone Pilot Ground School as a leading industry training course. Our goal? To help our students learn about sUAS operations so they can pass the Part 107 Aeronautical Knowledge Exam / Drone Written Test, but more importantly to help new drone pilots gain the training and confidence needed to operate at a commercial level. You can sign up for our pre-enrollment list by clicking any of the "Enroll in Training" buttons on our home page: http://dronepilotgroundschool.com We're shooting for a launch sometime in July. Your questions and feedback are both welcome!
  10. So from the reading i have been doing this morning it looks as if the FAA is planning to release the finalized NPRM Part 107... On Tuesday the 21st of June. This means that tomorrow could very well change the landscape of the UAV industry in the united states. Here is one of the articles i have been perusing to find out more information: http://www.suasnews.com/2016/06/part-107-drone-operators-need-know/ For those of you pending a 333, or waiting to see this could be a very exciting day that will help to lower your barrier of entry into the commercial UAV marketplace. Keep in mind this is still the federal government and the pace of implementation may be slow (several months or more). There is a lot to be done to set up new test and structure the licensure process. The nice thing is they have an infrastructure in place that already does digital tests for aeronautical knowledge, so this should help to speed up the process. If you are looking to do more than your typical sUAS operation (night flights, beyond VLOS, above 500 feet, over 55 lbs, there will still be a 333 exemption process for these more advanced operations. But most of your boiler plate operations and pre approved FAA blanket COA drones will be able to operate under the guidance and rules set forth in part 107. Cheers, and get ready to do some great flying! cc @Alan Perlman