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Aloha,

Living on an island has it's obvious pros, but there are definitely cons, such as a class C airport that covers a huge percentage of residential area...aka places I need to access for aerial real estate media.

After requesting authorizations for the individual sections of housing areas spread about the airspace, today I received a complete blanket authorization for the whole grid! 

I guess they just got tired of seeing my applications and put 2&2 together. Lol

Big Mahalo to the FAA! 

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Congratulations, that should make life a bit better.

The absurdity of all of this is this is remarkably similar for those of us who went through the 333 process.  At the end of the day the FAA pretty much just issued a blanket clearance because they don't have the resources or the staff who knows what they're doing.

They know what all the airspace is, they could post the requirements to fly in each type of airspace and then trust professionals to comply.     They need to focus on building a system that integrates drones, not try to exclude them. 

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4 hours ago, Av8Chuck said:

Congratulations, that should make life a bit better.

The absurdity of all of this is this is remarkably similar for those of us who went through the 333 process.  At the end of the day the FAA pretty much just issued a blanket clearance because they don't have the resources or the staff who knows what they're doing.

They know what all the airspace is, they could post the requirements to fly in each type of airspace and then trust professionals to comply.     They need to focus on building a system that integrates drones, not try to exclude them. 

They definitely made life easier with this.  The area map they sent me is from their new sUAS map system to be implemented next summer.  This will definitely make things much easier, as we'll be able to self-authorize a huge percentage of the flights, lightening the FAA office workload to focus on special auth cases.  I think it's a huge step forward actually.  Check out the map they sent back, instructing me that my ceiling is 400ft AGL, unless otherwise noted on the map.  Perfect set-up / training for the system to come.

 

IMG_9796-2.jpeg

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Drone professionals operate at the intersection of manned aviation and terrestrial-based resources.  The FAA provides this map thinking it means something to a drone operator, to some degree it might.  But that map/chart is more meaningful to a pilot in the air than an operator on the ground. 

The lines in the grid actually "cover" a distance on the ground, if a drone operator zooms into this map how can you determine if the house you want to scan is in the No-Fly zone, or the house next door?  The width of the line is probably more than the width of a street.   I'm guessing you choose whatever map you want to be displayed under the grid, a more useful map for drone operators might be a street map, but there's really no point of reference. 

Hopefully, they'll get this sorted and running soon.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Av8Chuck said:

Drone professionals operate at the intersection of manned aviation and terrestrial-based resources.  The FAA provides this map thinking it means something to a drone operator, to some degree it might.  But that map/chart is more meaningful to a pilot in the air than an operator on the ground. 

The lines in the grid actually "cover" a distance on the ground, if a drone operator zooms into this map how can you determine if the house you want to scan is in the No-Fly zone, or the house next door?  The width of the line is probably more than the width of a street.   I'm guessing you choose whatever map you want to be displayed under the grid, a more useful map for drone operators might be a street map, but there's really no point of reference. 

Hopefully, they'll get this sorted and running soon.

 

 

 

I hadn't considered it from this angle, but I see your point of view for sure.  One thing I'll point out that I think you'll appreciate, is that these maps will be integrated into the B4UFly app, meaning you'll be able to see which grid you occupy by zooming into the map.  As I understand, this will also be integrated into AirMap.

But definitely, in print, this means little.  It's the resource they currently have, so it's better than the first go around we had a year ago. lol  That was a fun experience in finite map plotting! 

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The problem with the approach so far is that it's built on a false set of assumptions, both AirMap and B4UFly were launched to solve a problem that didn't exist.  They were white boarded by committees of people who knew little to nothing about the issues professional operators would face and they were responding to the hyperbole from two or three years ago that thankfully just didn't happen.

There are not "millions" of drones in the air as predicted, until recently there had been no midair collisions and the recent midair resulted in little damage and certainly no serious injury or death.  It's ridiculous to think that operators are going to check with B4UFly, AirMap, DJI, and FAA.gov before every flight especially when there's such a potential conflicting information.

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13 hours ago, Av8Chuck said:

The lines in the grid actually "cover" a distance on the ground, if a drone operator zooms into this map how can you determine if the house you want to scan is in the No-Fly zone, or the house next door?  The width of the line is probably more than the width of a street.   I'm guessing you choose whatever map you want to be displayed under the grid, a more useful map for drone operators might be a street map, but there's really no point of reference. 

Working with ArcGIS on a daily basis, I think I can address your concern and state with confidence that those kind on things are scalable and as you zoom in, the line weight changes. Whether or not the zoom factor is capped either on the software side or just by a low-rez basemap is another story.

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13 hours ago, Av8Chuck said:

The problem with the approach so far is that it's built on a false set of assumptions, both AirMap and B4UFly were launched to solve a problem that didn't exist.  They were white boarded by committees of people who knew little to nothing about the issues professional operators would face and they were responding to the hyperbole from two or three years ago that thankfully just didn't happen.

There are not "millions" of drones in the air as predicted, until recently there had been no midair collisions and the recent midair resulted in little damage and certainly no serious injury or death.  It's ridiculous to think that operators are going to check with B4UFly, AirMap, DJI, and FAA.gov before every flight especially when there's such a potential conflicting information.

I see your point, especially regarding recreational pilots, but I will offer the side that professional pilots who want to self-authorize will do so via whatever app the FAA makes that option available.  If tomorrow morning the FAA were to announce that I could self-authorize controlled airspace but I have to use an app called 'Do Your Own Shiz', you can bet that would be the starting app on my phone immediately.

You can check out some of these maps now in B4UFly.  Open the app > MORE > Recommended Links > Map of Fixed Site Facility Restrictions

Here you will see how checking this will definitely assist in self-authorizing your own airspace on a per instance basis.  

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22 hours ago, Av8Chuck said:

The lines in the grid actually "cover" a distance on the ground, if a drone operator zooms into this map how can you determine if the house you want to scan is in the No-Fly zone, or the house next door?  The width of the line is probably more than the width of a street.   ...

 

 

Please, go here, zoom in and tell me if the grid lines are the same thickness when looking at the whole state vs just a city vs a single block...
https://faa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=9c2e4406710048e19806ebf6a06754ad 

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4 hours ago, JBR LIFE Photography said:

I see your point, especially regarding recreational pilots, but I will offer the side that professional pilots who want to self-authorize will do so via whatever app the FAA makes that option available.  If tomorrow morning the FAA were to announce that I could self-authorize controlled airspace but I have to use an app called 'Do Your Own Shiz', you can bet that would be the starting app on my phone immediately.

You can check out some of these maps now in B4UFly.  Open the app > MORE > Recommended Links > Map of Fixed Site Facility Restrictions

Here you will see how checking this will definitely assist in self-authorizing your own airspace on a per instance basis.  

You can go to the cloud service they have hosted on ESRI's server and get the latest info direct on your mobile or PC:

https://faa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=9c2e4406710048e19806ebf6a06754ad

 

Capture.JPG

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If you can zoom in to the required level of detail on the map, the FAA knows the location of all the airspace, then why does it take so long to get autherization?  

 

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4 minutes ago, Av8Chuck said:

If you can zoom in to the required level of detail on the map, the FAA knows the location of all the airspace, then why does it take so long to get autherization?  

 

A guess on my part is volume of requests. Now they are looking at turning authorizations over to an outside vendor under LAANC. It might become simpler and/or quicker, but are these outside vendors going to charge for the authorizations? Only time will tell.

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You can always count on the government to fowl up things to the point that nobody is going to follow the rules. This of course due to no response from the FAA for waiver requests. I’ve been waiting for three Waivers I requested over three months ago. Here is the funny part. I included with each request a Previous approved FAA waiver that match my request exactly. The FAA has already approved waivers exactly like my requested waiver. This is beyond comprehension.

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