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  1. 2 points
    Attention: This giveaway is closed. The deadline for entry was August 4, 2019, 11:59 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST). Winners have been contacted by email. UAV Coach is giving away two passes to InterDrone, the most comprehensive commercial drone event in America! Artfully designed to maximize your time, the conference includes 4 days of workshops, panels, sessions, over a dozen industry keynotes, and special events. The conference takes place September 3-6, 2019 at Rio Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. Prize Two winners will be selected to receive a 3-Day Plus Preconference Pass, valued at $960. Winners are responsible for their own travel, meals, and accommodations. How to Enter To enter, tell us why you want to attend InterDrone 2019 in up to 300 words by replying to this post. Scroll to the bottom of this post and enter your reply by midnight, August 4, 2019 for a chance to win one of two tickets to InterDrone 2019. Details Contest Opened: July 19, 2019, 2:00 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST) Contest Closes: August 4, 2019, 11:59 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST) Prize: 3-Day Plus Preconference Pass Admission to the preconference tutorials and Policy Day on September 3 Admission to all classes and panels on September 4, 5 and 6 Admission to Exhibit Hall on September 4, 5 and 6 Admission to keynotes, and Solutions Showcase sessions Admission to all special events, including the Networking Reception, After Hours Sessions and Enterprise Connect Networking Event Coffee breaks where indicated Winners: Two (2) The future of the commercial drone industry begins at InterDrone. Over the course of 4 days, attendees receive comprehensive drone training from the industry’s top speakers from world-class companies and entities such as DJI, the FAA and more. Attendees gain exclusive access to the leading drone companies on the show floor and the unrivaled opportunity to see the tech in person. UAV professionals from every corner of the drone world use InterDrone as the platform to network with fellow attendees within their vertical as content and special events are tailored to their specific enterprise needs.
  2. 2 points
    I'll second what Chuck said - your work is extremely impressive. I'd also be grateful to see you participate with us in the thread Chuck posted since I'm a frequent poster myself. I've learned a lot and hopefully passed on a few tidbits of my own.
  3. 2 points
    Hi, After Drone Pilot Ground School graduation & certification, I started a year ago with just my Mavic Pro and encouragement from a realtor friend. I enjoy photography so much that I quickly added interior stills and video to my business, but the aerials are what bring the clients. Fortunately for me, I’m older and retired and don’t have to support myself with this work. So I bought a Phantom 4 Pro last June and now have a Mavic 2 Pro for backup and for travel. I love the creative part of this work (post production!) and have gotten my clients all by word of mouth. It only takes a few, so create a portfolio and go for it! Marykayulsamer.com
  4. 2 points
    Good stuff in the linked article but there are several important things to remember; Our drones are not waterproof, so we should not ever fly in the rain. We can fly in light snowfall as long as that snow is not wet. Temperatures between 36*F and 25*F can produce wet or slushy snow, which further melts and turns to water than can enter electronics and cause problems. Colder temps generate "dry" snow which is usually OK to fly in. Avoid freezing rain or any condition that creates airframe icing. If you see ice accumulating in any form on the airframe or propellers land immediately as a crash is imminent. Ice adds weight that accumulates quickly and disrupts the airflow over the propellers. Falling snow reduces visibility. Understand you will not be able to fly as far away and still maintain line of sight. Don't try to push for long distances in falling snow, even when using FPV, as snow is a solid and will attenuate radio signals. If you aircraft is becoming hard for you to see the radio signal is becoming hard for the aircraft to see. Searching for your aircraft after a fly away in 4' deep snow is no fun. Plan your take off and landing areas. You don't want to land and bury your camera in the snow. Clear away the snow for an area large enough to take off and land. I've flown numerous times in temperatures as low as +2*F and in light snow with no problems aside from some slight "notchiness" in gimbal pan rotation. Understand that a crash in cold weather can be disastrous for some plastics as they become quite brittle at low temperatures. Plastic props can shatter if they have become cold and get bumped into things. If you use common sense and follow some decent safety practices you can do a lot of cold weather flying with few or zero problems.
  5. 2 points
    Drone has been sold. Thanks for the inquiries!
  6. 1 point
    Thank you @Dave Pitman. We appreciate your support and are excited to be able to work closely with the FAA on the new Recreational Drone Flyer Test.
  7. 1 point
    Hi @Alan Perlman Thank you for your response. Don't worry about the delay I have been helping bounce ideas off of @Steveb on a weekend get away in Spain, under the business forum. I will check out the drone jobs guide and see if there's anything in my area that i can find at least to start off with. Both @Chase Flynn | UAV Coach and you talk about setting up a portfolio based website, are there any websites in particular that you would recommend? As of right now one of the few gallery websites I've looked into is Envira Gallery. This site caught my attention because they also have forums that visitors or clients can read for tips. I have subscribed to the magazine "Entrepreneur" To help keep me motivated and I like hearing or talking with others who have been successful. I will look into the suggested reading material as well. Again Thanks @Alan Perlman for time and input.
  8. 1 point
    Hi @JustinT, Welcome to the UAV Coach Community Forum! @Alan Perlman offers some great advice and there are also some great bonus lectures in the Drone Pilot Ground School course that you might find helpful in getting a drone business started. I think one of the most important things to figure out is what area of the drone industry interest you the most? It could be photography/cinematography, mapping, agriculture, inspections, and the list continues to go on. I knew from the start that I really enjoy the photography and filmmaking side of the industry and that is the direction I am going to direct my business to over time. Once you figure that out, you will want to figure out your name, slogan, branding, etc. It is important that you choose a name that is unique and something that people will remember. For example, I live in Michigan and did not want a generic name like 'Michigan Drone Services' or something like that. There are two issues with a generic location based name: 1.) People might think that you will only do work in that state. 2.) There are many names that sound just like the other and it will be difficult to differentiate yourself from the competition. For example, I named my business 'Galactic Droneography' with the slogan "Out of this world Droneography." I have had quite a few people that have told me they loved the name, logo, and overall branding theme. Like @Alan Perlman said, building a service business is difficult, so it's important to stand out and have a name and a service that people will remember. Once you have all that figured out, purchase a drone that will be suitable for your intended application and practice flying until you are comfortable with the drone and its various features/flight modes. Once you are comfortable with the drone, get out there and build up a portfolio, that way you have something to show a potential client. Building a website is apart of this step because you need to have an online presence. A potential client is more likely to look you up online before ever sending an email or picking up the phone to contact you. There are many website building websites that make it relatively simple to build a great website. I personally used wix and have been very happy with the website. Now I did not use one of their templates, I built it out how I wanted it to look. However, there are some really good templates on the website if you do not want to design your own. Here is my website as an example: https://www.galacticdroneography.com Another thing I cannot stress enough, is to have all of the systems you think you need operational before you ever send out that first email or make that first phone call. Have an email for business, website, online payment system (I use Square), invoice system, a business phone or phone app that makes a different phone number but it is routed to your own phone, legal contracts, etc. I like to research potential clients that I would like to work with. For example, my fist commercial job was in October at a place place known as the Scripps Mansion. I saw the house and knew I wanted to have that house in my portfolio. I sent a friendly email introducing myself, what I do, and more importantly, what I could do for them. They ended up hiring me for the job and they were thrilled with the results. Most of the time you will need to educate the client on what you do and why they need your services. It can be very challenging, but also very rewarding when you send those photos and video over to your client. One thing I forgot to mention is the importance of knowing how to edit photos and videos. Being able to edit a picture or video and bringing it to life shows your client that you know what you are doing. It drives me crazy when I see someone trying to sell an unedited photo with a DJI watermark on the corner of the photo. It just looks really unprofessional. Flying the drone is only one part of it, being able to capture a stunning image or video and telling a story is the difficult part that is often over looked. Practice, Practice, Practice, is my best advice. Even if you take a basic picture that may not be that great, edit it anyways and learn. Sometimes I look at some of my early edits and I would never post them now haha. You get better with each flight, email, phone call, edit, etc. Sorry for the long post and I hope this helps. In all honestly, this response just begins to scratch the surface of getting a drone business up and running. It's a learning experience and I am just getting started. Good luck and feel free to ask me any questions! - Chase
  9. 1 point
    FAA-Certified Drone Pilot Wanted: Ashburn, Georgia A We Get Around Network Member - on behalf a real estate agent - seeks an FAA Certified Drone Pilot for:✓ Location: Ashburn, Georgia✓ Property type: two residential properties near each other (aerial photos only)✓ Deadline: ASAP but no later than Wednesday, 21 August 2019✓ Deliverables: edited aerial photos✓ WGAN Member will refer you to the real estate agent to work directly with your client This is a free lead. Just trying to help out a We Get Around Network Member seeking help. Thanks, DanSmigrod@WeGetAroundNetwork.com
  10. 1 point
    Im a helicopter pilot and it’s not uncommon to land in spaces where there’s obstacles about 20 feet from the rotor. I’m low and slow and if something unexpected like a lawnchair flies up it’s easy to pull in a bit of power to arrest the decent or just move off to the side if there’s room. My point is when helicopters come and go the pilot is on high alert, if a drone appears out of nowhere I’ll deal with it. Can it be dangerous absolutely, is it dangerous, not necessarily. It’s like when a squirrel runs out on the road, if you see and it’s safe to stop, slow down or move around it you do, if it’s not, you hope for the best and look back to see if it made it. Despite the total over reaction drones and manned aviation can live in harmony...
  11. 1 point
    Hi @Adam G, I am going to echo what @Av8Chuck said. Hospital heliports are not controlled airspace, therefore you do not need permission from the hospital to fly there (you would need FAA authorization if the heliport happens to be within controlled airspace). Just to be clear, the FAA has sole jurisdiction over the National Airspace System and the overall operation of drones. The hospital has no legal authority to grant or deny your drone from flying in that region of airspace. Now they could ask that you not stand on their property and fly, which they have the right to do. The FAA authorized your operation, meaning they believed that your operation can be completed safely without a high risk of error based on numerous factors. As always, remain vigilant when flying and always yield to manned aircraft operations. I hope this helps! - Chase
  12. 1 point
    What I’m pointing out is your assuming the drone is violating the rule from watching the video. It can be very deceptive viewing pictures or video especially from that altitude.
  13. 1 point
    I recently got a job opportunity to fly my drone and capture video footage of a bridge. This client is a transportation firm and participated in the design of the bridge. Can I fly over the bridge to get footage if there are cars on it? I know I can fly over stationary cars but what about moving. If flying over moving cars isn't allowed, can I get a waiver to do this? I am part 107 certified but never came across an answer to this situation. I feel like there are lots of little situations which aren't specifically answered by the FAA. Any advice helps! Thanks! Max
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Absolutely would! It's a give and take benefit for professionals. I believe it would add professionalism and legitamacy to the industry who would with the laws and separate those reluctant to do so and obtain licensing for commercial use.
  16. 1 point
    Sounds really good to me. I’m in NJ and get a lot of Presidential TFRs. Flying in the outer ring makes a lot of sense! dave kotinsky
  17. 1 point
    Similar to Dave's comments, its important to understand all the aspects of this type of project bid request since the prep time, drive time, flight time, post processing time, deliverable packaging (video, photos), and customer reporting all add up very quickly. I'd recommend setting several pricing/fee tiers for the different activities involved. Here is an example: Prep-time $30/hr, drive-time $30/hr, flight time $125/hr, post-processing $30/hr, packaging-reporting $30/hr. These $/hr amounts are totally arbituary. When you have a standard billing/pricing/fee rate, you can make exceptions via discounting individual pricing elements to submit a competitive bid. Having a 107 license, flight insurance, getting authorization to fly in the project area, and following a set of safe flight operational procedures and FAA reporting are value-adds of your service (bid) and lessen the liability of the customer. Hope this helps, go for it!
  18. 1 point
    Yes have already registered for the part 107. Yes you did help. Thank you very much.
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    Aloha UAV community, I just returned from a trip to Europe, where we rambled through a few countries, ending in the Swiss alps. Switzerland, as it turns out, is super drone friendly, and has a well developed, easy to understand set of rules for UAV operation. To satisfy the insurance part of their rules ($1M CHF liability for all operators, hobbyist or commercial), I found that my PPA coverage is global...so that's awesome! The trip itself was a whirlwind, and I was able to snag only one flight in this town, during fading light, so I made the most of it and had a go. Here are a couple of my favs from the set, shot on a Mavic 2 Zoom. Enjoy, and Mahalo for viewing!
  21. 1 point
    LOVE the night shots! Any special techniques with the drone settings and/or editing those?
  22. 1 point
    0:12 — You misspelled "introducing"! 1:21 — you take a shower while you're there? (just kidding, I like the effect though) And I love the last few shots showcasing the hiking, surfing, etc. options around the property. Such great storytelling!
  23. 1 point
    Here's an image from a recent shoot in Captiva using my Mavic 2 Pro.
  24. 1 point
    I've gotten the same from some of the homeowners who've been around when I shoot. And the houses look incredible. My typical response is , "Are you serious? Do you do contract work?!?!"
  25. 1 point
    Well I gotta ask.. what’s the use case for this? Haven’t done a lot of operations in the rain (some inspections and flood response videos) but every single time we ended up with rain on the camera lens and ruining the shots. Every so often the wind or movement would clear the lens.. but for the most part we’d have to land and clean the camera. There would definitely be times I could see this as helpful... so how are y’all ( JBR specifically... love your stuff) getting around this issue. Thanks in advance.
  26. 1 point
    Hey Bill, thanks for posting. I’m a consultant (civil engineer) in Brevard so it’s good to see SJRWMD getting into the use of drones. They’re a great tool, and we use them for almost all of our current engineering projects. We use a Phantom 4 Pro and process in Pix4D. Since almost all of our projects involve a surveyor, we have the benefit of using very accurate GCPs for processing our imagery. As you might know already, the altitude readings are based on barometric pressure. They’re going to be relative readings, meaning that even if you calibrate the drone before flight, the altitude is still going to be some “random” value that doesn’t correspond to any real NAVD88, NGVD29, etc. value. Until you use an RTK model (or something along those lines) or input some type of ground control information, you’re not going to be able to achieve any real level of vertical accuracy. Your horizontal accuracy may also be off by a decent amount (5-10 ft in our experience). Your imagery may also “tilt” in one direction since there’s no vertical control to orient it correctly. To achieve what you’re looking for, your best bet (for having a small budget) is to input some type of ground control in your Pix4D processing. There are some pretty cheap GPS units out there that could give you a decent measurement of x, y, and z. By setting a few targets and inputting some “good enough” values into Pix4D, it will greatly improve your results. They won’t be perfect, as the GPS units have limited accuracy, but it would be a big improvement over no control at all.
  27. 1 point
    Hi folks! I'm excited to announce that we'll soon be redesigning the UAV Coach website, as well as this forum. Have gotten some great feedback from you all over the last several months and look forward to rolling everything out soon. In the meantime, in case you missed it on our blog or in our latest community update emails, I wanted to introduce Flyte, a drone flight ops management platform and our newest community sponsor. Click here to request a 30-day trial, and read more about their platform below. What are you using to plan and log your flights? What most people don’t realize about operating sUAS is that 80% of the work happens before and after the flight. That’s the sad reality of being a professional drone pilot. You’ll spend more time planning, logging, rendering and producing data than flying. An app like Flyte can streamline a big chunk of the non-flying part of your operation by helping you: Conduct airspace research. Need to know if you’re flying in controlled or uncontrolled airspace? If there are any other hazards or special airspace considerations in the area? You sure do. Capture / save / send that research. Check out the map below. See the alert and caution icons? And how you can create custom marks on the map? You can save all of that research as well. This is particularly helpful to send to a client or other crew members ahead of time. Good for demonstrating professionalism. Work offline and in-field. Flyte is good for using at home, but you can also use it in the field, before and after flying, to ensure you’re always equipped with the info and resources needed for strong situational awareness and in-the-moment logging. Log your flights, batteries, and aircraft. Even if you’re not a certified sUAS operator, you should be mindful of logging your battery usage and aircraft maintenance schedule. That’s just...taking care of your stuff. Not to mention the safety considerations. Flyte was built for both individual operators and teams. Their platform enables management of multiple pilots, drones, risk assessment / documentation to ensure the effective management and digital records of all activities. Click here to request a 30-day trial of Flyte for you or your company.
  28. 1 point
    OSMO Mobile 2 For Sale $110 Used - Mint condition Free Shipping to the Continental USA No shipping outside the Continental USA No returns
  29. 1 point
    @JBR LIFE Photography which lenses are you using with your A7? Remember, the A7RIII is a full frame camera that shoots great 4K video and 43MP stills. I think the resolution in this camera outweighs the difference in dynamic range. @Talon Six Aerial keep in mind that for aerial the ability to control the camera from the ground in real-time is a significant advantage. It’s quite easy to control the Sony, not sure how you’d do that with the BM-Pocket Camera. @JBR LIFE Photography remember this conversation from about a year ago? I don’t think you had started using the A7 yet. I know the economics haven’t changed but Imagine getting aerial with that camera! It will rock your world. We’re flying the A7 with the Sony G240mm lens. It’s amazing...
  30. 1 point
    At least it isn’t a DJI... It will be interesting to see how well this works.
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    Hello everyone! I’m still new to the droning world but I’m on my way to becoming a better drone pilot. I purchased my first drone in December 2018 and just passed my part 107 exam thanks to the help of Drone Pilot Ground school. Excited to be a part of this community. John Hale
  33. 1 point
    Nice work! Very smooth, good use of slow & steady, kept me engaged, and gave a good sense of the property. If I could offer one nitpick, it would be to keep the ceiling fan status consistent. If one fan is on, turn them all on, and vice versa. Personally, I prefer fans to be on and as slow as they'll go. But I do have one client who very much dislikes moving fans in video, so I make an exception for her...because it's her money and whatnot. Regardless, great job, let's see more soon!! 🎬🎥🏠💰
  34. 1 point
    Hey pilots. recently DJI halted production on the Phantom 4 series. DJI has its "reasons" but this is a blow to the drone industry because the Phantom 4 Pro is widely regarded as the best all-around drone on the market. The industry is leaning too much toward to hobbyists with a steady stream of foldable drones while leaving out more serious commercial pilots (we are their customers too!). I believe the community needs to come together to show our dismay with DJI. I think the best action to do is by contacting DJI (https://www.dji.com/contact) with our thoughts. If enough people reach out to them, it could give them a reason to change course.
  35. 1 point
    1. Scope of work Aerial Infrared thermography of transmission power line using drones for hot spot/Fault detection. Classifying the severity of the fault base on known relevant methodology and the current load percentage. Using radiometric thermal imaging system and appropriate platform (Drone/VTOL) Analyzing and reporting. 2. Characterization of requirements 2.1 Defining of flight profile (Height, Velocity, Background, Clutter, Distance from object, Angle, Field of view). 2.2 Choosing the write platform (Drones, VTOL, flight time depend on payload weight. Charging on site, Autonomous capability, stabilizing capability/Gimbal, integration of payload to the platform, communication, level of data security). 2.3 Choosing radiometric thermal imaging system and NOT thermal camera, choosing the right optics for measuring temperature of faults and not only detecting faults, there is big difference between detection and measuring. 2.4 Elimination of false alarm and solar reflection during flight. 2.5 Measuring the fault temperature based on the right emissivity, otherwise you measure wrong temperature. 2.6 Classification of the fault severity and schedule of the repairing. 2.7 Defining all kind of potential faults in power transmission lines. 2.8 Preparing and defining template of the test report. 2.9 Considering all regulation issues that relevant to the mission in SOW. 2.10 Attention and solution for obstacle in the Flight Route (Parallel of transmission power lines, crossing of distribution power lines, communication network etc.) 2.11 Recognizing the pole in terms of number and coordinates (the pole and drone GPS not at the same position). 2.12 Choosing of Analyzing software or using SDK. 3. Milestones of the project 3.1 Execution of paragraph 2. 3.2 Purchasing of radiometric thermal imaging system including lens. 3.3 Integration of the radiometric thermal imaging system with CCD camera. 3.4 Execution of POC and on site pilot. 3.5 All the analyzing and reporting must made by certificate thermographer with aerial infrared thermography of power transmission line from helicopter.
  36. 1 point
    I've got one on the way. I'll let you know how it turns out.
  37. 1 point
    Greetings, Derrick I'm more is the KISS school of thought on this (keep it simple, stupid). I use a UAV Pilot Logbook from Parhelion Aerospace. It's about 9" x 5" and slips easily into my drone carrying case so it's with me whenever I'm out flying. The logbook has spaces for everything you mentioned --though of course you can't download drone files into it. Bill
  38. 1 point
    Hey @dnedzel I highly recommend looking into https://airdata.com/ for flight tracking, monitoring, and analytics. And https://kittyhawk.io/ for drone management and obtaining flight waiver (they also have limited flight tracking). Let me know if this helps.
  39. 1 point
    Those are some great time lapses. Some very good photography as well. I’m guessing you edited this compilation to show off your TL’s? It is a good reel but it’s a bit long. I’ll certainly check out your Pond5 if I need any stock footage. Thanks for sharing.
  40. 1 point
    I did that with the $300 drone just got it out of the backpack all shiny and pretty but I didn't have the GPS on so when I took off it did this loopty-loop thing hit a tree flew down the tree then hit a car LOL all within 10 minutes of having it
  41. 1 point
    You are certificated, not any entity. Is your driver's license issued in the name of your company? Nope. Same with pilot/operator certification.
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    Hey guys, It wasn't letting me upload the images directly, so here's the imgur link Happy to take more if you need 'em. Mavic Pro Bundle
  44. 1 point
    I have an Inspire 1v2 referbished, four batteries, multi battery charger, extra props, nd filters, HPRC 2780W hard case.. Flown maybe a dozen times. No problems with it at all. Thought I might have more use for it and need to downsize the fleet. One of the batteries came with it. The other three are the higher capacity. Five extra sets of props (two per set). The wheeled case is pretty large, but stores the Inspire in the landing position. I have about 2300 into it would take 1800.
  45. 1 point
    Actually, never mind. I watched it again and it does flow through the House really well. There are some areas, like the living room where there might have been more shots than needed, I’d be guessing that’s where the customer might have wanted to add shots back in. My critique is just me being bitter because I hate you for capturing paradise. It’s a tough job but someone’s got to do it.
  46. 1 point
    If you're a true rookie I would start off with a holystone drone that you can get off of Amazon. They are cheap, they allow you to crash and they will teach you fundamental flight maneuvers. Check out this video for more information:
  47. 1 point
    Appreciate the feedback, all! @JBR LIFE Photography, here's the original file — https://www.dropbox.com/s/dk5jo1jbfw3km3a/DJI_0074_original.DNG?dl=0 Would love you to work your magic. Alan
  48. 1 point
    Hi, I’m new to the drone community. I have two birds in my fleet: a Phantom 4 Pro v2 and a Mavic 2 Pro. I’m near Bastrop, TX (central Texas) and I’m in the process of developing a business model that will turn this flying hobby into a full time business. I’m a systems engineer and consultant full time at Microsoft and specialize in Dynamics 365 ERP platform and am an Microsoft Cloud Architect. Areas of interest are technology, Hank (my Belgian Malinois working K9), self-defense, crossfit, travel, gun ranges, and photography.
  49. 1 point
    Chris, thank you for posting this. That was totally ridiculous on that individual's part. I hate to say it but we know his issue was not really about drones; pretty sad. Kuddos to you though on staying controlled. That would have been hard for me especially when he was disrespecting and profiling you. Anyhow, keep up the good work bro.
  50. 1 point
    Good luck with your program. We've been doing that here in California for the last three years. Before the introduction of 107 most of the instruction was STEM related with little hands on experience. Surprisingly after 107 the class morphed into two parts, teaching students to pass the 107 with considerably more hands on primary flight training and a more application specific curriculum of using drone in industry. Its easy to see how this will extend into more about remote sensing and the sorts of problems that can help solve. Its challenging to find the right balance, high school students get bored really quickly...