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  1. 5 points
    All that single shot orthomosaic tells the farmer is where the in-field variablility is on that day, but not what causes it. And unless you are calibrating for reflectance, you won’t be able to confidently compare orthos between two dates. Unless you are a trained agronomist, and/or have scientific training in crop sciences, geography, remote sensing or related - or can partner up as a data collector for an outfit that can do the required analysis - your service (and value to the grower) stops after data collection, since you’re not qualified to provide Rxs (what multitude of soil and other factors are creating that in-field variability? You certainly can’t tell from a single orthomosaic captured on one day and the farmers know that). There are many agronomic service companies that could benefit from quality reflectance maps, but your role would be a service provider to them, not directly to the grower.
  2. 5 points
    Recently got back from a short trip to Miami Beach with my family. Woke up at sunrise on our last morning there to sneak in some drone flying at South Pointe Park. Feedback, particularly when it comes to the color grading, is welcome!
  3. 3 points
    In our area most of the professional real estate photographers have added a drone to their toolbox. The aerial photography is just a piece of the overall marketing puzzle. You’ll likely need to have additional cameras to get hired to shoot real estate, but if you can shoot and edit excellent aerial footage you can probably learn the traditional photographic skills.
  4. 3 points
    First RE video for 2019! Fun fact: this house had three offers within 5 days of listing.
  5. 3 points
    Yep! You'll get your hard card in the mail in 6-8 weeks. You're good to go in the meantime. Blue skies and safe flying out there
  6. 2 points
    I'll second what Chuck said - your work is extremely impressive. I'd also be grateful to see you participate with us in the thread Chuck posted since I'm a frequent poster myself. I've learned a lot and hopefully passed on a few tidbits of my own.
  7. 2 points
    Thanks for the feedback Chuck. The day of the shoot was completely overcast, so those blue skies in the drone shots are total fakes (yay for color masks). I did the best I could with the interior light, plus I was dragging around a FalconEyes RX18 to provide some extra light for the rooms. The house was dark though since the skies were darkening all afternoon. When I cranked up the brightness in FCPX, I started getting noise, so I had to balance between the two issues. In the end, what you saw was about the best I could do given the totality of the circumstances I’m using a Panasonic GH5 with a 8-16 lens for my interior work. I just picked up a 15mm Sigma f1.4 that I’m looking forward to using for interiors on the next shoot.
  8. 2 points
    I concur, very well done and I too like the slow steady camera moves. The challenge with slow camera movement is it can significantly slow down the pace of the video and make it feel longer than it is. The cure for this is to not use so much of the shot. You had a few reveals where it took a while to move through the doorway or hall, unless there’s something compelling I don’t need to look at the door or hallway very long. Cut out most of the move and get to the payoff faster. You get the benifit of the move without slowing down the pacing. Also, natural light really saves on time but it’s also very flat. Unless you have a property or realtor willing to pay for the extra time it takes to light, you can use something like DaVinci Resolve to pump up the volume and brighten up the scenes. It will make your shoots appear more three dimentiomal. These are just suggestions on areas you might want to improve in. Quality wise your videos are starting to look really good. Curious what camera are you using? Keep up the good work. Thanks for sharing.
  9. 2 points
    Are you interested in becoming a part of Operation Drone Search & Rescue We are looking for retired firefighters, police officers, military vets and citizens who are FAA part 107 certified to help volunteer for Search & Rescue, Disasters, Infrastructure, Damage Assessment, etc missions when requested, working through a unified command system with Fire or Police Departments, Cities, Governments, FEMA and private citizens. You do not have to be a drone pilot to join but you must be a retired firefighter, police officer, military vet’s, or citizen. We are looking for pilots in command, visual observers, communications, logistics, PIO, webmaster or just boots on the ground. We will set up task force around the country. All volunteers will abide by all FAA regulations and will at no time deploy or freelance own their on. We are looking for Volunteers in Florida at this time but will take volunteers from anywhere in the US. Classes below should be completed within 1 year of start date. Volunteer Requirements Incident Commander NIMIS FEMA 100, 200, 700, 800 https://training.fema.gov/nims/ Jay Manley SAR Course (Free) https://courses.droneproacademy.com/courses/search-and-rescue-with-jay-manley Night Flying By Larry Woods Course Pilot in Command must be FAA part 107 certified NIMS FEMA 100, 200, 700, 800 classes https://training.fema.gov/nims/ Jay Manley SAR Course (Free) https://courses.droneproacademy.com/courses/search-and-rescue-with-jay-manley Night Flying by Larry Woods Course Visual Observer NIMIS FEMA 100, 200 https://training.fema.gov/nims/ Jay Manley SAR Course (Free) https://courses.droneproacademy.com/courses/search-and-rescue-with-jay-manley Visual Observer Training by Larry Woods Safety Officer NIMIS FEMA 100, 200, 700, 800 https://training.fema.gov/nims/ E/L 954: NIMS ICS All-Hazards Position Specific Safety Officer https://training.fema.gov/nims/ Radio Operator's CERT Emergency Communications Module Participant Manual Flight Release Officer Requirements Coming Soon Logistics Officer Requirements Coming Soon Financial Officer Requirements Coming Soon ALL VOLUNTEERS MUST AGREE TO BACKGROUND CHECK AND HAVE HEALTH INSURANCE For information on any of the positions email d_saxon@operationdronesSAR.org
  10. 2 points
    Women and Drones highlights the aviation gender gap in this illuminating article: Women Drone Pilots Women account for 5.8% of certified FAA remote pilots. This number has steadily increased over the years, but the ratio of women compared to men in aviation is still significantly off balance. Read the full article for more statistics on drone pilots, and let us know how you think this gender gap may affect the industry as a whole in the comments below.
  11. 2 points
    I can only speak about my experience on the Canadian prairies. It is very difficult to compete against the commercial aerial applicators. They have their own agronomist on staff. They have direct connection with the chemical companies. If the farmer hires their services they do the prescription for free. On a typical day they will cover 10,000 to 20.000 acres. An agronomist is expected to cover 5,000 to 6,000 acres per day. Unless you specialize in a high value crop or find a niche I found it very difficult to be competitive when the work is being done for them for free.
  12. 2 points
    Aloha all! I recently had the pleasure of filming a $21M home on Maui, with the challenge of squeezing most of the goodies into a single minute. Admittedly, this was a tough one. The interior space is rather dark, so I needed a bit of lighting to help out. The property itself is heavily guarded by trees on the ocean side, making it tough to actually see. Additionally, there are so many special features of this home, a minute isn't nearly enough to showcase them all, so selecting the best of the best was a chore. Overall, I'm quite pleased with the outcome, and the client is most definitely happy, which is the most important thing. This video was shot on a Mavic 2 Zoom and Sony A7R3. Enjoy!
  13. 2 points
    **The entry period for this giveaway has closed. Congrats to our winners @Mike Frye , @Euphorion , @Dioptra Adam , @Teri B , and @Ed Kozak . Information on how to claim your VIP Pass has been sent to the winners via email.** Greetings from UAV Coach — We're excited to announce an exciting opportunity for our UAV Coach community members. Providing a space for drone pilots to network, to share stories, and to offer advice to one another is a passion of ours. We hope to provide you with opportunities to grow and advance in the industry. That's why we've partnered with AUVSI to host an awesome giveaway. UAV Coach is giving away five VIP Passes to AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2019, the largest, most comprehensive trade show for unmanned and autonomous systems. At this conference, the winner will get to connect with 8,500 technologists, regulators, and users across commercial and defense sectors. The winner will also have an opportunity to meet with members of the UAV Coach staff attending the conference. The conference takes place April 29 - May 2, 2019, at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. Prize Five winners will be selected to receive one VIP Pass, valued at $1,599. With this pass, you'll have access to: All four days of the conference, including educational programming XPO Hall Keynote Sessions Women and Diversity in Robotics Special Event Startup Showdown Competition Conference Proceedings VIP Club Access Chairman's Reception Winners are responsible for their own travel, stay, and dining accommodations. How to Enter To enter, tell us why you want to attend AUVSI XPONENTIAL in up to 300 words by replying to this post. Scroll to the bottom of this post and enter your reply by March 5, 11:59 PM for a chance to win one of five passes to AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2019. Giveaway Details Contest Opened: February 20, 2019, 12:00 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST) Contest Closes: March 5, 2019, 11:59 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST) Prize: One (1) VIP PASS to AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2019 Winners: Five (5) Whether you're new to unmanned systems or have been in the industry for years, AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2019 has something for everyone. XPONENTIAL brings together people, speakers, and exhibitors from across the globe and from more than 20 industries to convene to discuss where the industry is now, and where it is headed. There will be over 700 exhibitors to see unmanned systems in action and over 150 sessions for learning. Whether it’s hands-on demos, thought-provoking keynotes or speed-networking sessions, we give you the opportunity to experience all things unmanned. Submit your entry by March 5, 2019, 11:59 PM EST for a chance to win!
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    A small job I did for a friend that owns their a real estate company. Nothing to fancy, nothing compared to @JBR LIFE Photography. Just looking for some feedback so I can improve in the future.
  16. 2 points
    Sorry, I realized I had the exposure too high on this, re-worked it. Here's the correct version I meant to send you. Catalog should match this one now. This also means there wasn't as much data loss in the highlights as I had thought initially.
  17. 2 points
    Good stuff in the linked article but there are several important things to remember; Our drones are not waterproof, so we should not ever fly in the rain. We can fly in light snowfall as long as that snow is not wet. Temperatures between 36*F and 25*F can produce wet or slushy snow, which further melts and turns to water than can enter electronics and cause problems. Colder temps generate "dry" snow which is usually OK to fly in. Avoid freezing rain or any condition that creates airframe icing. If you see ice accumulating in any form on the airframe or propellers land immediately as a crash is imminent. Ice adds weight that accumulates quickly and disrupts the airflow over the propellers. Falling snow reduces visibility. Understand you will not be able to fly as far away and still maintain line of sight. Don't try to push for long distances in falling snow, even when using FPV, as snow is a solid and will attenuate radio signals. If you aircraft is becoming hard for you to see the radio signal is becoming hard for the aircraft to see. Searching for your aircraft after a fly away in 4' deep snow is no fun. Plan your take off and landing areas. You don't want to land and bury your camera in the snow. Clear away the snow for an area large enough to take off and land. I've flown numerous times in temperatures as low as +2*F and in light snow with no problems aside from some slight "notchiness" in gimbal pan rotation. Understand that a crash in cold weather can be disastrous for some plastics as they become quite brittle at low temperatures. Plastic props can shatter if they have become cold and get bumped into things. If you use common sense and follow some decent safety practices you can do a lot of cold weather flying with few or zero problems.
  18. 1 point
    Aloha gang! I'm proud to present a few images from yesterday morning's drone flight. Through LAANC, I was able to get a special authorization from FAA & the control tower manager to fly this location for a beachfront home (not pictured). While the mission was a beach home, I couldn't resist grabbing a couple shots of the airport itself. What I was most impressed with was how smoothly the approval process went. From request filed through LAANC (AirMap) to authorization was less than 2 weeks. I had to submit a custom unlock request to DJI, which was approved within hours, and loaded to the aircraft days before the mission. A quick call to the tower the morning of the flight, and the manager was already prepared, as he authorized the mission. We recapped the mission details (altitude, duration, radius of operation), and ended with 'Call me when you're done so I'll know, until then I'll keep the traffic off your spot as best I can.' This is the second '0 zone' I've been able to get approved for flight. The first was further away from the airport, but not by much. Seems like if you have a solid plan and a reasonable tower manager, there's a good chance you'll be approved. Details about the flight itself: Mavic 2 Zoom equipped with 3mi vis anti-collision lighting (top white, port, starboard), 300ft operating radius, 75ft AGL max altitude. Operation time was 8am-9am. Enjoy & Mahalo for viewing!
  19. 1 point
    I’m guessing it’s a reasonably busy airport but a small community of operators who ask for permission to fly. Once people in the tower get to know you they’re generally nice about giving permission. Curious, did the requirement to call the tower come with the waiver?
  20. 1 point
    For those interested, this drone has been upgraded to carry a Sony A7RIV 75MP camera integrated with a FLIR Toa1280 SWIR. i think the upgrade is $7.50..
  21. 1 point
    Thousands of photographers cannot wait to take their lens to the skies thanks to drones equipped with consumer- to professional-grade cameras. We've created this post as a guide to capturing aerial drone photography like a professional, from shooting modes to exposure settings to lens filters. Drone Photography: A Guide to Capturing Images Like A Professional All of the topics we’ll cover in this guide include: Investing in the right aerial photography drone From purchase to practicing safe flying Shooting modes and general exposure settings Drone camera filters Post-processing drone photography Becoming a professional drone photographer
  22. 1 point
    You maybe aware of this but in stabilize mode the throttle simply determines the speed and therefore thrust of the motors. Were you expecting a more controlled decent ?. If so you might want to try descending in Alt hold or one of the other modes that uses Alt Hold to control altitude. http://ardupilot.org/copter/docs/altholdmode.html#altholdmode-controls As you will see in the above in Alt Hold mode the throttle stick is now controlling the rate of climb or decent rather than simply the thrust of the motors. Also note that a range finder like we have discussed in another thread is good to have if you are using this mode as its more accurate than the built in barometer of the flight controller that uses air pressure to sense altitude.
  23. 1 point
    And one more for today. I thought I'd share this small condo video to point out that cinematic video presentations can help almost any property. All ya gotta do is spend a bit of time finding the charm in a place. Enjoy!
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    Thank you Chase. At some of my sites, I am flying in relatively high winds, so am using the M200. I am in the process of gathering and analyzing data and am pretty confident that the workflow I have developed will be helpful for managing water leaks. The DJI Pilot software has its issues, but with time I think better options will be available.
  26. 1 point
    Interesting I would have though that until the EKF shows white it would not have allowed you to arm i.e part of the pre-flight checks. Sometimes the GPS can't get a fix from a sufficient number of satellites when indoors but that should also have also stopped you from arming unless you have the arming checks disabled. http://ardupilot.org/copter/docs/prearm_safety_check.html#prearm-safety-check Maybe EKF is not part of those checks. I'll have to look into that further. Anyway glad that its working now.
  27. 1 point
    While I haven't tried it, my initial reaction is that a joystick control seems like a great option if it is in a fixed environment, e.g. like when you are sitting in an aircraft or at a workstation with a sim. Walking around with it in an unfixed configuration with it attached to the remote does not seem ideal to me.
  28. 1 point
    Hi all, I just got this email from one of our https://dronepilotgroundschool.com students: Here was my response back to him, and curious how other pilots in this forum choose to weigh in. --- Hi there, both great models! "Worth it" is highly dependant on you and your goals as a 'dronepreneur' Some quick thoughts: How will you ever know without trying? Both models are perfectly suitable tools for taking high-quality aerial photos / video. I know pros who still use the Phantom 3, which isn't as strong of a camera or sensor set as your two options right now. The magic isn't in the camera itself, but the post-production...see the latest videos in this thread and feel free to scroll back a few pages to see earlier additions. Some great professional real estate marketers sharing their videos! It's a very consultative sales process — you're going to have to hustle and grind and keep building out your list of target clients and proactively reaching out to them to better understand what kind of service delivery (pricing, packaging, turnaround time, etc.) you feel comfortable with. It's a young industry. There's a TON of opportunity out there, but it's not easy money by any means. Building any kind of service-based business is really tough. Hope that helps!
  29. 1 point
    I have volunteered to fly my drone for the local county tourism office. The tourism office is interested in creating a video to announce a new pedestrian and biking pathway soon to be developed. The tourism office would like for me to fly and video tape the proposed pathway for future use. I suggested to the office that we may need to communicate to the general public that on certain days there will be drone flying in this general area. The office is also interested in printing a flyer , to be handed out, informing the local residents and address any concerns prior to flying. Can anyone help or suggest what steps we can take reduce any problems with the general public. This area is low populated , towns of less that 10,000 and very rural.
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    Hi team, Greetings. Am Mr.Meshack Sanga,a Tanzanian boy living in Dodoma City. I want to be trained to be drone pilot.my goals is to use for commercial like mapping and surveys
  32. 1 point
    Hello, We are a software platform that helps solar companies use drone imagery to survey and design projects. We may need a drone pilot in the St. Louis area, preferably who has some solar experience. At a minimum, we would expect the pilot to be familiar with the concepts discussed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M10GCIg0ka8 If you're interested, please let me know. Best, Jason
  33. 1 point
    Here's a few from the news Drones were not necessarily given credit in every story, but they were considered an integral part of the SAR effort. Drone and search dog help find missing man on family farm Video shows how drone is helping the search for missing Andreen McDonald Response to deadly storm is latest in the growing use of thermal-imaging drones Woodland search in Midlothian for missing man Ross Taylor Autistic woman in Round Rock found safe Calgary hunter found safe after disappearing while tracking animal Another Life Saved by a Drone with Thermal Imaging Community rallies to find lost rescue dog Max The DroneUp Search and Rescue Mission at Amboy Crater How injured border collie was found by drone Mountain Rescue Aspen's Drone Implementation Saves Hiker's Life Drones Saved Four People in One Day Last Week
  34. 1 point
    I've got one on the way. I'll let you know how it turns out.
  35. 1 point
    thx Alan great insights!
  36. 1 point
    Hello, I would like to share this test flight video of ART25-QFS from ARTCOPTER, a drone & drone component manufacturer based in Korea. The main purpose of this flight (hovering, actually) was to test/measure the flight time of this quadcopter with T-MOTOR MN5212 KV340. The total weight (including a TATTU PLUS LiPo battery) was 6.4kg, which was a little bit heavier than we aimed, and the weather was windy, so I didn’t expect too much from this trial. But it made 40 minutes of quite stable hovering! (we expected 30-35 minutes at most) We are planning on testing other motors as well, and studying how the max flight time would change by reducing the total weight of the same frame. https://youtu.be/thPNAnNqVw8
  37. 1 point
    I am East Bay droner and willing to help this cause when you have a plan for an organized effort.
  38. 1 point
    Hi, I find your work beautiful, the photos are very well done _______________________________________________________________________________________________ VPN Nox AnyDesk
  39. 1 point
    Hey all, there's this Drone Photography Guide you can now download for free here: https://skylum.com/l/air It covers everything about drone photography, from 'how to get started tips for beginners' to really advanced tutorials on flying and shooting in different modes.
  40. 1 point
    @Av8Chuck Drones have been in use by the military for longer than they have been used by civilians for commercial purposes. I think that is fair and accurate to say, even while the technology supporting military UAVs may have developed on a track of its own, separate from the technology behind civilian and commercial drones. So no, civilian drones did not come from the military, I agree with you there. There are large differences in the design and purpose behind each. However, I don't think it's fair to discredit the writer based on their observation of UAV use evolving over time. And again, going back to the main point of the article, the gender gap has been documented and reported by credible sources, including the FAA's own U.S. Civil Airmen Statistics for anyone interested in taking a look at the numbers themselves.
  41. 1 point
    I think it's legit to have these discussions in open public forums. Sometimes compliance isn't cut and dried, or we're still just learning the ropes, and it's helpful to talk through our questions and thought processes. Plus, violators can screw it up for all of us. In my experience, if we jumped through the hoops to get special approvals (like BVLOS, flying over people, flying at night, LAANC authorizations, etc), and someone asks, we take the time to tell them that because we want people to know we are complying with the rules and flying safely and legally. Public perception matters and can influence rulemaking. It's not always convenient, but that's not the point. Personally though if someone tries to talk to me while I am flying solo, I'll generally tell them I would be happy to answer their questions after I land, but that I can't field questions during flights for safety reasons. Sometimes I even post a sign to this fact. For me looking at this photo, there is no way to know if they have a VO. If they were in radio contact with a VO to maintain constant communication, a VO could be stationed at another location in the survey area in order to maintain unaided line of sight when the drone passes out of the RPIC's direct line of vision or to watch for other safety issues in the intended flight zone. For example, I've had VOs on the other side of a river from when I was flying 1) so they could alert me to hikers passing through that part of the survey zone so I could avoid flying over them, and 2) to respond quickly if there was a malfunction and the aircraft went down on that side of the river; someone walking up to me would have been unlikely to see that VO or know they were involved in drone operations. So far I never have never called the cops on someone, and I see people violating basic 107 rules all the time in the SF Bay Area. I asked Oakland PD about this once at a street festival where there were phantoms hovering directly over large crowds, and they claimed it was a "grey area" about whether it was allowed -- in other words, they don't care because they have bigger issues to deal with. But if I thought someone's activities posed an immediate threat to people or wildlife, I would call local law enforcement. And people do call the cops about drones. I fly in different places around the US, and in some places we contact the local law enforcement in advance just as a courtesy in case they get any calls. Some don't care, others have asked us to call them with daily updates so that they know what's going and can better field public calls. YMMV...
  42. 1 point
    It is. You need a Part 107. It would be great if you have experience with Ardupilot. We’re starting contractors out as camera operators with the opportunity to become UAV operators once you’ve demonstrated proficiency flying our Y6’s. Probably the more difficult aspect of this opportunity is the length of deployment in the field. The coverage area is from Bakersfield to the Oregon boarder and we won’t know the assignments until after each crew is trained. Depending on how many people we hire for this project will determine how long each team will be deployed. It could be as long as three weeks at a time. Our SOW is until the end of April but it’s doubtful the project will be completed by then so there’s the possibility it will be extended. I’ll post a job description shortly.
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    That is just absurd. Isn't the whole point of drones to get to places where you couldn't otherwise? Just like when cyber crime first came into play they will need to adapt and respond accordingly.
  45. 1 point
    Actually, never mind. I watched it again and it does flow through the House really well. There are some areas, like the living room where there might have been more shots than needed, I’d be guessing that’s where the customer might have wanted to add shots back in. My critique is just me being bitter because I hate you for capturing paradise. It’s a tough job but someone’s got to do it.
  46. 1 point
    @JBR LIFE Photography did you get to drink that coffee that's being made at 1:12? Hehe, great video! I know I've told you this before, but I love the variety of shots you do — it really showcases the property and what it would FEEL like to live there. Re: Peter Lik, it was a great gallery. I've always been a fan of his work, though I have mixed feelings about his pricing and pricing fine art in general (interesting article here). Also had a lot of fun at the National Geographic gallery a couple of blocks away. Beautiful prints that my 2yo got a kick out of.
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    Have flown with Ryan a bunch and can vouch for his equipment being in top shape. This is a great deal!
  49. 1 point
    Aside from "avoid weddings", my advice would be to establish a half day rate which should be roughly 2/3 of a full day rate. A day in the videography industry is generally 10 hours with an hour for lunch (+/- an hour depending on market). So if you're going to commit to to a wedding, your time alone should be a minimum of a half day rate. You may also consider an hourly rate for post processing. The logic behind a day rate versus an hourly or final project time rate is that you're tied up for several hours before, during, and after the ceremony whether you're shooting or not. MedicFL1 was spot on with insurance (see my "avoid weddings" comment). You also have to factor in amortization of the drones, your cameras, software, computer hardware, your insurance costs, etc. These all play into your bottom line. As for how much to charge, I think it totally depends on the market. Where I operate, drones are not well established in terms of providing value, so I can't get away with charging the same as my competitors in Denver 90 miles to the south.
  50. 1 point
    Good luck with your program. We've been doing that here in California for the last three years. Before the introduction of 107 most of the instruction was STEM related with little hands on experience. Surprisingly after 107 the class morphed into two parts, teaching students to pass the 107 with considerably more hands on primary flight training and a more application specific curriculum of using drone in industry. Its easy to see how this will extend into more about remote sensing and the sorts of problems that can help solve. Its challenging to find the right balance, high school students get bored really quickly...