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  1. DJI’s products never seem to launch without a leak or two. But lately these leaks have gone from a few pieces of information here and there to full-on lists of specs and details about the product. And DJI’s forthcoming FPV drone is an example of this new normal—we first started hearing about it last summer in connection with a patent for a camera that looked like it could be made for an FPV drone, and since then the leaks have just kept coming. We've even gotten a glimpse of the actual product: So when will it actually launch? And why is it producing so much buzz? Read today's post to read everything we know so far about DJI's forthcoming FPV drone.
    4 points
  2. @Dave Pitman I love Danny MacAskill! I included that first video in one of our recent weekly roundups. The filming and the riding/stuntwork are just mindblowing.
    4 points
  3. We need a drone that can fly in 50 knots of wind and has enough fps, 120, at 4k ideally. We have yet to have our needs met and are hoping that the fpv pro version will be able to do so finally. Do you think this is wishful thinking in this version?
    4 points
  4. Is your crew doing close proximity cinema? One of my fav athletes (super humans) is Danny MacAskill. Some classy close proximity drone work (Andy Lawrence) in his last video for anyone interested.
    4 points
  5. It’s an overpriced piece of...? Not that I’m bitter and tired of competing with plastic toy drones.
    4 points
  6. Yeah DHawk, everyone has been friendly and professional to this point. I was very attracted to the business model and the fact I will receive support, marketing, and jobs. I can still work my FT job in the meantime. Update- I just received my login info for the 107. I'm excited and more confident in my investment now. So far so good!
    4 points
  7. Funny Chuck, before I got to your last paragraph, I was already thinking about how AirMap, and others, came up with a grand scheme, sucked in some like-minded VC $$, hired some lobbyists and went about fabricating a problem for which they would be paid to provide a solution. And, walah! the UTM idea was born. It's an amazing idea. Record all of the uas operation "meta data" in the entire country and store it. Then, if something goes wrong, the "recording" can be queried to try and find out what happened and who is responsible. The model has already been proven by the NSA. UTM aims to take it even further. At least with PRISM, all of the tax payers got to chip in. With UTM, a much smaller contingent has to pay for it. The FAA keeps harping on the need for UTM to enable mass BVLOS operation. But they don't want to discuss the novel idea that only those operating mass BVLOS, thus requiring some way to assign accountability, are the ones that need a plan and will need to pay for it. The problem for AirMap with this idea is that Boeing, Amazon, UPS, fill in the blank, will administer their own programs with no need of AirMap. AirMap needs those that cannot build the infrastructure on their own to pay them.
    3 points
  8. Hi! This is a collection of my videos from my first 3 months of flying with my FPV drone. Hope you enjoy it😃 Would be great to get some feedback from other FPV pilots.
    3 points
  9. It's a small scale classic Ponzi scheme. File reports at the FBI, FTC, Local Police and Ic3.gov. If everyone files they'll get this guy or guys. They need to pay for this crime.
    3 points
  10. Thanks for the compliment @AncientAirship! I just realized I've been negligent and have not posted any of my work for months. Lemme rectify that: Anyway, to answer your question local market demands should somewhat drive where you spend your creative energy. There are never enough motion VFX artists to go around, so that is certainly something that is a worthwhile skill to have. My real estate clients generally don't know what they want in terms of VFX and motion graphics. There are a handful who are super concerned about their own personal branding, but beyond that as long as I communicate the rough specs of the property they have been happy. On the VFX side I routinely do some light VFX with steam, sun rays, and cleaning up skies (lots of wildfires out here). For example in the video above - sun through the trees, skies over the deck, steam over bathtub: all VFX. Here's another commercial property video that's all drone (M2P) and incorporates a lot of motion text elements to communicate the property highlights: Cheers! - Matt
    3 points
  11. I'm new to the forum but spent quite a while going through all the posts in this thread and it's been really interesting seeing everyone's skills and techniques improve over the last couple years. @JBR LIFE Photography, your work and @Av8Chuck and @Talon Six Aerial are all consistently high quality so I feel you know the industry quite well. Since this thread is about the future too, what do you (and any others active in this thread) think is going to be next? I live in downtown Chicago so clearly the scene is very different from Maui (most shots are of a specific condo or commercial building rather than a single home), but drones are already a norm, virtual tours seem to be everywhere... what's next? For example, I haven't been in the game too long, but I've already noticed an increase in requests for motion tracking and random VFX cleaning up videos; requests like having floating text that's revealed behind a building, or removing objects from footage to make it look cleaner. Here's an example of what I'm talking about (footage is not mine, just the VFX): I'm curious where I should be focusing my professional development as I seem to be getting increasing real estate work. What VFX and motion graphics are people interested in for these videos? I know a large skyscraper is going to have a larger budget than a normal homeowner, but I suspect homes in the multi millions are likely to have some wiggle room in their budget as well. Side note: I'm excited to be part of the forum! Apologies for writing a book and definitely let me know if I inadvertently violate any rules (for example is it normal to call out posters directly or is fine to assume most active members are following the topic?). I had a lot of fun reading through the thread.
    3 points
  12. Flying since early August. No complex missions yet until I get used to more simpler ones but been getting steady jobs.
    3 points
  13. This thread is really receiving some attention. What a ride we are all about to go on. Hopefully getting started is a bit easier for you folk not in California! I've been tryin to get my advanced training class scheduled for a few weeks now but the covid restrictions here are making it a pain.
    3 points
  14. @btjdrone Prior to signing up myself, they gave me 2 licensees that were already up and running to contact. One they provided because the market was very similar and another just because I asked for more than one. They both weren't extremely helpful but they did answer a few questions. As far as Feedback goes I haven't done my first mission yet. I have received the drone, completed the online training, Website will hopefully be done next week. Last thing is they want you to do a 2 day in person training course to really understand how to work the drone you are purchasing. Not just basic flying but the different settings for the IR Camera etc. That is all I am waiting on but due to Covid the classes have been pretty difficult to get squared away. I would recommend being ready to wait. If you sign up, I wouldn't expect to start flying commercially the following week. It takes some time. @dragonbaseball68 I think most people on this forum aren't flying live missions yet. We are all somewhere between just signing the agreement to waiting on in-person flight training before going live. I have spoke to a few people and there are those who are just doing it solo and will hire more pilots as it makes sense and then there are people I've spoke to who are taking the approach you are where they have a pilot or two on standby as contract pilots being paid per job. For all of our sake, I hope we all need to hire more pilots and the work is plentiful.
    3 points
  15. Hey gang. I'm curious. Those of you who made the investment and got your materials. How much money have you actually made? and in what period of time? That is ultimately the bottom line.
    3 points
  16. Each autumn and spring one can see an exciting phenomenon here, as the fish try to clear the rapid by jumping over it. About 300 years ago, Jacob, the Duke of Courland, invented a way to catch with baskets placed along the rapid the fish that came upstream to breed and jumped across the rapid. Due to these fishing devices invented by Duke Jacob, Kuldīga used to be called to be a town where you can catch salmon in the air. One could catch as many as 80—100 salmon a day.
    2 points
  17. The interesting parallel I thought of was the Xray I had taken this week. That photograph was taken by someone unqualified to render a decision or diagnosis. She was only there to collect data for the expert. When I am actually surveying or measuring anything? And what about photos from the ground of a building? How is THAT different?
    2 points
  18. If the drone operator is providing a ground surface file which elevation contours can be derived from, the operator should be a licensed drone pilot (FAA Part 107) and a licensed surveyor in most states. If you are just taking photos for Real Estate presentations, you should be FAA Part 107 licensed but should not need to be a licensed surveyor. I am a FAA Part 107 pilot and a licensed surveyor in many states, including Michigan. I don't make up the rules but must abide by them. The creation of ground surface files using a drone is not a simple matter and when done incorrectly can have costly impacts to the client, adjacent land owners and the general public. I believe the rules need to be clarified to make a distinction between Drone surveying applications and Drone photography.
    2 points
  19. We don't do any cinema. I worked in the entertainment industry for about 20 years developing tech for digital film effects. We sold the Software we developed to Apple in 2002 and I called it a day. That guy is insane. Having said that, I really enjoy watching Danny MacAskill. It's so great to watch someone who's so talented but so gracious and so humble. While watching the first video I couldn't help thinking one mistake and his career, if not his life could be over in the blink of an eye. It was interesting hearing in the behind the scene video that his crew felt the same way and there were moments they couldn't watch. All of those guys are talented but I think the FPV cinematography kind of detracts from his performance. Too many sweeping arcs and flyby's. In the ski video the camera guy kept all the attention on the skier. Both are really talented but I really wanted to see the drone follow Danny on some of the more technical transitions down the slab. Both of these videos are great. But the other difference I think worth mentioning is that Danny was risking his life and to a much lesser degree the lives of his crew but that was their choice. As talented as the skier and camera operator are, they were endangering the lives of some really inexperienced skiers that came very close to getting hit. At the speed he was traveling there would have been serious injury. No matter how talented these guys are they're risking a lot to produce YouTube videos.
    2 points
  20. A very interesting development. A demonstration of a UAV navigating using internal maps and AI when GPS fails. I think this could be a huge development. https://www.timesofisrael.com/in-first-delivery-drone-gets-to-destination-in-israel-without-gps-signal/
    2 points
  21. You guys are all a bunch of drone industry geeks
    2 points
  22. Hi @Zacc Dukowitz no worries, anything I can do to help. Regarding the UTM, we now have two CRADA's with the Navy and our principle investigator is also part of the NASA committee for UTM so I've heard a lot about what works and what doesn't. Interestingly, as I've heard some of this Patrick Eagan has reported on the same issues. Not exactly the same way that I hear it but he must also know someone who is a part of the UTM testing. You know the expression "Follow the Money." There's a lot being said about UTM but there was very little public debate on was it necessary in the first place. It was all attributed to "safety" which pretty much quelled any rational debate. I mean, who would be against safety? When you look back on what I call "The Summer of 2017" when the FAA issued "guidelines" of how they "literally" control everything from the grass in your backyard to FL65 which meant that you couldn't fly in your own backyard, not even a kite. Then they had to issue more guidelines defining a kite and how it wasn't included. Really? Not that these laws mean anything, but its against the law for the FAA to regulate commerce, so if you follow the money are they breaking any laws if they turn to a "Public/Private partnership" (The three blue blocks in your diagram) to accomplish this for them? I would argue that it is but I'm not an attorney. I would also argue that's it a conflict of interest if any of the money collected for user fees as part of the UTM could not be used to fund any part of the FAA. People justify drone registration because its only $5, that's to the registrant. The FAA has taken in almost $9M. Where did that money go and where is it being spent? How is the FAA being held accountable for such a sizable amount of money. How much is UTM going to cost to deploy? Who decided it was necessary? Why do we need LAANC? Who, if anyone, made the case for UTM? Everyone who has a financial stake in its development that's who, but the statistics don't warrant it.
    2 points
  23. Confirming that AirMap deleted that post after it created a lot of backlash for them. @Dave Pitman you're right, I think that was definitely them slipping up and stating their true mission. @Av8Chuck, had no idea NASA's UTM testing was so shaky. Can you share some links to where you read/heard about that? Would be curious to read up on it. Dave did a good job a while back checking me when I was writing about UTM and really just adopting an industry perspective without thinking about how its rollout could impact drone service providers/individual operators (hobbyists too, for that matter). Hope I'm doing a better job now—I want to write 'the facts' (what the FAA/industry reps are saying and what it seems like is happening on the testing front) but I'm trying to do better at considering whom will be impacted and what that impact might look like. Thanks for keeping me honest Dave and Chuck, know I can always count on you to share your frank thoughts.
    2 points
  24. I think the biggest hurdles are airspace and safety. The worlds airspace is so busy without throwing in new flying machines at low altitude, bad weather and [at least for now] who will fly them and how will it be regulated - will you need a pilot licence or will they introduce some new licence? Uber definitely bit off more than it could chew with their predictions, after all it is flying, even if it's based off a multi-copter design. In fact as everyone knows the multi-copter is inherently unstable and needs some nifty electronics to not fall out of the sky - now go put people in them . Obviously Airbus should be at the forefront of building a flying machine and how its integrates with current regulations/airspace, but this is certainly a new sector and will be difficult to predict progression without putting in the test flights first.
    2 points
  25. Hi Zacc, I think it is a well written summary of the current state of things, well done!
    2 points
  26. We're celebrating our company's 5-year anniversary this week. Our team can't thank you all enough for reading, for training with us, and for helping to push this industry forward. It's been a wild ride. Here are a few thoughts on what we've learned. Would love to hear what you've learned as well! Please share.
    2 points
  27. Oops, sorry. Just when I thought I was done... I realize that people generally don't agree with this, but HOBBYISTS ARE NOT DRIVING THE COMMERCIAL ADOPTION OF DRONES PERIOD! I know that people want to believe in the easy button and cheap but that's not the way markets grow. It has nothing to do with who has the best mousetrap, and everything to do with peoples eversion to the cheese. If anyone's really interested you should read Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey Moore. Its an oldie but a goody that explains the technology adoption life cycle and the hobbyists or techies role in market development. I realize that all of those Facebook geniuses think its different now but its not.
    2 points
  28. So very cool! I grew up on a farm in Iowa. I have some cool stuff of the farm I grew up on - my uncle farms it now. Here's one I did of some silage harvest last year. I have a few more in the can too...just have to find the time to edit.
    2 points
  29. For those who want to move on and salvage what you can I have a few suggestions. Take an inventory of: Everyone who paid and what did you get, drone, website, training etc.. Anyone who paid and got nothing? Has anyone received a partial or full refund? Does anyone know how many "licensee's" there are? Is there a list? All of those who became part of DronesForce should exchange contact information. As @Patricio has started to do, everyone should exchange or post your URL [if you received one] and what was your "territory". In the commercial drone market your not likely going to be competitors. There's probably safety in numbers when it comes to sorting out what happened but more importantly in helping each other get started. I would also recommend that you segregate the issues of getting your money back versus deciding what you want to do next. Obviously you want to share as much information as possible and do all you can to recover your investment but Online that will turn into a presidential election. For those that are going through this if you received the hardware [and hopefully the website] then you can consider this an expensive education but you might still get some value from this and help the others that were screwed out of everything. There's no reason that you can't all work together to form a "Coalition" and pick up where DronesForce left off. Not saying it will be easy or ideal but it might be manageable if you work together. Try not to point the fingers at one another, don't be a victim.
    2 points
  30. I’m convinced Steven Marsh in this thread is Alex Larson Also, Arwin at Memphisuav is Alex +1 (901) 531-9799. He's going to talk in a southern accent but listen closely and you'll hear Alex. This is also true of Chris P from www.vancouver-aerial.com. +1 (778) 655-8540. He’ll talk with a Canadian accent but he’s also Alex. And finally, Eric P from Alburquerque DukeCityAerial.com +1 (505) 605-6945. I recorded all my conversations when talking with anyone related to Drones Force. I didn’t record these conversations because I was suspicious. I did it so I could review my notes when putting together a business plan. The weekend before I was going to send my $20k, I reviewed all my conversations in one sitting. That’s when it became clear to me that Alex was posing to be all these partners. I didn’t notice at first when I had these initial conversations because a week or two would pass before I had my next conversation. However, when you listen to these conversations back to back to back, it’s quite obvious that Alex is everyone. Even the so called other employees in the office. This for me was the last straw. I’m so glad I recorded these conversations. I had a lot of other concerns and saw many other red flags that moving forward was not going to be a option for me. I hope some of this information is helpful. Good luck moving forward.
    2 points
  31. I don't know if it's real or fake but either way, for me, it ranks right up there with the cat hanging from a ceiling fan and lighting farts on fire. I'm sure the guys has already crashed it by now and called DJI tech support. It would be more interesting listening in on that conversation.
    2 points
  32. Hi Guys, @JBR LIFE PhotographyI love the use of rain and people. Most of the realtors in my area discourage using people in their videos. I think people want to see people, helps them visualize what they might look like in that home and makes the property video a little more about lifestyle than cabinets.. @AncientAirship thanks for viewing and noticing the improvement in everyone's techniques (accept @JBR LIFE Photography) You know I couldn't pass that up.. Jonathon is a great example of how much of what he does today would have been considered "VFX" work just four years ago. The use of graphics, syncing to music, great photography, using cinematic moves of the camera, aerial, color grading etc.. All done with a great deal of thought on what message is being conveyed about a property. Most realtors four years ago would have said that wasn't necessary, today many require it. That's what creative leadership looks like. Its taken a while but everyone on this thread has done an outstanding job of helping each other improve, demonstrated by @AncientAirship's comments. So welcome to the community, hopefully you'll get as much out of participating as I have. That's enough Mr. Nice Guy, you know I must want something... I haven't posted here in such a long time because I haven't shot any property videos but that doesn't mean that I haven't had fun with video. Here are three of my latest. I think I may have posted one of them on this forum but nobody watched it. WTF? All of these videos use the same techniques that I use on property videos.
    2 points
  33. Aloha gang! It's time for some more visual storytelling! This video I'm sharing today marks the last project I shot on the a7iii/a7Riii combo. (upgraded to a pair of a7Siii's). The aerial star of the day was the Autel Evo II Pro. I gotta say, the more I use it, the more I love it, although it has a few kinks to be worked out. This home was on the market with another agent for over a year, with no movement, and barely any traffic. The agent who picked up the listing is a dreamer and visionary who definitely thinks outside the box. In fact, I'm not convinced she even believes there is actually a box, and I love that about her. After hearing the client's vision ideas & concepts, and reviewing the old listing imagery & video, I sat down to write up a storyboard. As I'd hoped, it was a 'go' on first draft, although once on-site there were a couple minor story adjustments. But for the most part, what I wrote is what you'll see in the video. Sound design was definitely inspired by @Talon Six Aerial, as I learn a ton from him about that.
    2 points
  34. DDD I can not speak to others and how they feel, only myself and my past experience with being in business. There are some "Back Room" process they take care of that I will not have to worry about until I am up and running, if I choose to. Such as data storage, editing of video, and an app they created for people to order services as well as the website. Also, I have never paid only $500 for a website, by the time it is done I have spent anywhere from $1500 - $3000. I do not produce website myself and I do understand that once you have the template the rest is simple. However, even if I had $14k remaining, I can easily spend that in business if I don't know what I am doing, with Drones Force, and frankly they other licensee's I have an amazing network of help, including this website. That is probably the main issue for me is the support of an organization that wants me to be successful. I have in the past gone into business and the people telling me they would support me only to discover that once I started to get successful they started viewing me as a competitor and no longer saw themselves as a mentor. I know there are a lot of great people out there to help, but I do not know who the good ones are and who the bad ones are so who do you trust? I have already invested and I do hope that I get my money worth and would be a little defensive now if someone told me I was an idiot or over paid for the service, that is human nature. Everyone has their reason for stepping up and paying and then there are those who have their reason for not stepping up. Usually it is past experience that dictates whether you do something or not. Ultimatley you have to go with your gut, buying something is always an emotional decission, no matter how much your brain tells you anything different...but I also drive a Raptor and a Challenger, so I might not be the best one to ask when it comes to buying things, ha ha.
    2 points
  35. Reporting to ya'll after first few weeks in operations. Got my first payment last week for the first 3 weeks. Had a few missions but they were basic that's the only thing. They told me more complex missions they will start marketing after 90 days of basic ones. Also looking at getting a friend trained, as I see the calendar is slowly filling up. Good luck guys and I'll keep ya'll updated.
    2 points
  36. Just dropping in so I can stay in the loop. Just signed the license agreement (Austin,TX) I already have my 107 but I'm going to do all of the training to get all of the benefits.
    2 points
  37. I like the drone footage accompanied by a very nice description of the vintage lighthouse. I'm sure there aren't many cast-iron lighthouses in the world. Most of the rebar skeletons are covered by concrete.
    2 points
  38. Hey everyone. I'm the Buffalo/Western New York licensee. Just signed the agreement on Friday. I'm pretty excited about it. It's very nice to see that other people are doing it too.
    2 points
  39. Hi all, I am also signed with them out of Central California. Awaiting my equipment and website is in the process. I am already 107 trained. As far as I know the next process will be doing in person training with dart drones and then hitting the ground running. It seems as though there are a lot of us all within the same starting process. I've already connected with a couple of the new licensees. It would be very nice for us to create an environment we can communicate to each other.
    2 points
  40. Sounds like everyone that has moved forward with Drones Force is happy and given what was promised. I really appreciate all the feedback and please keep updating as you move forward with your business.
    2 points
  41. Have a great fourth of July Weekend. Check out this aerial tour of the USS Alabama, a World War 2 Battleship that played a part in many campaigns in the Pacific Theater.
    2 points
  42. Hey everybody. For the past twenty years, Louisiana has been a well sought out destination for the film and television industry. Dubbed "Hollywood South", the state has produced billion-dollar box office hits, Academy Award Winners, and everything in between. We will be taking a look at some of the most famous movie locations in Louisiana, so sit back relax and enjoy your tour!
    2 points
  43. Yeah, NO.. Sure the concept that a large percentage of first responder drone programs started internally, usually with the assistance of an outside organization or donated equipment etc is valid but very few, if any, of the first responders are "hired" to run or operate the "drone" program. The other point I would take exception with is that 25% of drone programs start from the top-down. That might be true but those top-down programs probably account for the largest percentage of jobs which is a reversal from when this started. If you remember in 2014 the two big markets that were projected to account for 80% of the $128B commercial drone market by 2020 was entertainment and agriculture. Local TV commercials, property videos and NDVI only accounted for approximately 10% of the money spent in this market but probably did account for the majority of the people out there trying to do it. Sorry, but I think this "report/study" is naive. Its almost written from a consumer perspective. The adoption of Commercial UAVs is driven more by the acceptance and the transformation to digital engineering than being driven by bottom up or top down growth.
    1 point
  44. Welcome to the forum. We used to have people who provided classes on thermal and photogrammetry but unfortunately I have not been as active as usual so I don't know if they are still offering that through UAV Coach. One thing you may want to keep in mind is you might find non-drone related thermal or photogrammetry training more thorough and accessible. Its your knowledge of those technologies that companies pay for not the fact that you can fly a drone. Applying that skill set to the drone is pretty straight forward.
    1 point
  45. I'm sure this has been asked before: I am getting the Mavic Air 2. I have the Mini that does not require Registration with the FAA. I know I have to register the Mavic Air 2, but do I also have to take an ONLINE test? It is not very clear. Thanks. I apologize if this has been asked a million times before. Larry in California
    1 point
  46. Those shots are amazing. I really like how some very creative people incorporate technology into their art. Not just in using the technology to create the art but also integrating it into the art. This is very cool.
    1 point
  47. Hey Scammed, As you guessed there are over 30 people who lost money. You should join the FB group.
    1 point
  48. Hi - I have similar questions as well. I'm flying a Mavic Mini (I figured start small, and if I need better toys I'll get it). I have a 107 license. I've been a Commercial Real Estate Broker for 15 years and have access to all the clients I need. But there is a void in my area for drone photography who know what the end user is looking for. I have no interest in shooting residential footage, in fact I'd like to avoid it. Do people shoot at flat rate, or $/hr depending upon scope and travel time? Also, do you charge extra for post production or leave that for others. Thanks
    1 point