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  1. DJI’s products never seem to launch without a leak or two. But lately these leaks have gone from a few pieces of information here and there to full-on lists of specs and details about the product. And DJI’s forthcoming FPV drone is an example of this new normal—we first started hearing about it last summer in connection with a patent for a camera that looked like it could be made for an FPV drone, and since then the leaks have just kept coming. We've even gotten a glimpse of the actual product: So when will it actually launch? And why is it producing so much buzz? Read today's post to read everything we know so far about DJI's forthcoming FPV drone.
    4 points
  2. @Dave Pitman I love Danny MacAskill! I included that first video in one of our recent weekly roundups. The filming and the riding/stuntwork are just mindblowing.
    4 points
  3. We need a drone that can fly in 50 knots of wind and has enough fps, 120, at 4k ideally. We have yet to have our needs met and are hoping that the fpv pro version will be able to do so finally. Do you think this is wishful thinking in this version?
    4 points
  4. Is your crew doing close proximity cinema? One of my fav athletes (super humans) is Danny MacAskill. Some classy close proximity drone work (Andy Lawrence) in his last video for anyone interested.
    4 points
  5. It’s an overpriced piece of...? Not that I’m bitter and tired of competing with plastic toy drones.
    4 points
  6. Funny Chuck, before I got to your last paragraph, I was already thinking about how AirMap, and others, came up with a grand scheme, sucked in some like-minded VC $$, hired some lobbyists and went about fabricating a problem for which they would be paid to provide a solution. And, walah! the UTM idea was born. It's an amazing idea. Record all of the uas operation "meta data" in the entire country and store it. Then, if something goes wrong, the "recording" can be queried to try and find out what happened and who is responsible. The model has already been proven by the NSA. UTM aims to take it even further. At least with PRISM, all of the tax payers got to chip in. With UTM, a much smaller contingent has to pay for it. The FAA keeps harping on the need for UTM to enable mass BVLOS operation. But they don't want to discuss the novel idea that only those operating mass BVLOS, thus requiring some way to assign accountability, are the ones that need a plan and will need to pay for it. The problem for AirMap with this idea is that Boeing, Amazon, UPS, fill in the blank, will administer their own programs with no need of AirMap. AirMap needs those that cannot build the infrastructure on their own to pay them.
    3 points
  7. Hi! This is a collection of my videos from my first 3 months of flying with my FPV drone. Hope you enjoy it😃 Would be great to get some feedback from other FPV pilots.
    3 points
  8. It's a small scale classic Ponzi scheme. File reports at the FBI, FTC, Local Police and Ic3.gov. If everyone files they'll get this guy or guys. They need to pay for this crime.
    3 points
  9. Each autumn and spring one can see an exciting phenomenon here, as the fish try to clear the rapid by jumping over it. About 300 years ago, Jacob, the Duke of Courland, invented a way to catch with baskets placed along the rapid the fish that came upstream to breed and jumped across the rapid. Due to these fishing devices invented by Duke Jacob, Kuldīga used to be called to be a town where you can catch salmon in the air. One could catch as many as 80—100 salmon a day.
    2 points
  10. The interesting parallel I thought of was the Xray I had taken this week. That photograph was taken by someone unqualified to render a decision or diagnosis. She was only there to collect data for the expert. When I am actually surveying or measuring anything? And what about photos from the ground of a building? How is THAT different?
    2 points
  11. If the drone operator is providing a ground surface file which elevation contours can be derived from, the operator should be a licensed drone pilot (FAA Part 107) and a licensed surveyor in most states. If you are just taking photos for Real Estate presentations, you should be FAA Part 107 licensed but should not need to be a licensed surveyor. I am a FAA Part 107 pilot and a licensed surveyor in many states, including Michigan. I don't make up the rules but must abide by them. The creation of ground surface files using a drone is not a simple matter and when done incorrectly can have costly impacts to the client, adjacent land owners and the general public. I believe the rules need to be clarified to make a distinction between Drone surveying applications and Drone photography.
    2 points
  12. We don't do any cinema. I worked in the entertainment industry for about 20 years developing tech for digital film effects. We sold the Software we developed to Apple in 2002 and I called it a day. That guy is insane. Having said that, I really enjoy watching Danny MacAskill. It's so great to watch someone who's so talented but so gracious and so humble. While watching the first video I couldn't help thinking one mistake and his career, if not his life could be over in the blink of an eye. It was interesting hearing in the behind the scene video that his crew felt the same way and there were moments they couldn't watch. All of those guys are talented but I think the FPV cinematography kind of detracts from his performance. Too many sweeping arcs and flyby's. In the ski video the camera guy kept all the attention on the skier. Both are really talented but I really wanted to see the drone follow Danny on some of the more technical transitions down the slab. Both of these videos are great. But the other difference I think worth mentioning is that Danny was risking his life and to a much lesser degree the lives of his crew but that was their choice. As talented as the skier and camera operator are, they were endangering the lives of some really inexperienced skiers that came very close to getting hit. At the speed he was traveling there would have been serious injury. No matter how talented these guys are they're risking a lot to produce YouTube videos.
    2 points
  13. A very interesting development. A demonstration of a UAV navigating using internal maps and AI when GPS fails. I think this could be a huge development. https://www.timesofisrael.com/in-first-delivery-drone-gets-to-destination-in-israel-without-gps-signal/
    2 points
  14. You guys are all a bunch of drone industry geeks
    2 points
  15. Hi @Zacc Dukowitz no worries, anything I can do to help. Regarding the UTM, we now have two CRADA's with the Navy and our principle investigator is also part of the NASA committee for UTM so I've heard a lot about what works and what doesn't. Interestingly, as I've heard some of this Patrick Eagan has reported on the same issues. Not exactly the same way that I hear it but he must also know someone who is a part of the UTM testing. You know the expression "Follow the Money." There's a lot being said about UTM but there was very little public debate on was it necessary in the first place. It was all attributed to "safety" which pretty much quelled any rational debate. I mean, who would be against safety? When you look back on what I call "The Summer of 2017" when the FAA issued "guidelines" of how they "literally" control everything from the grass in your backyard to FL65 which meant that you couldn't fly in your own backyard, not even a kite. Then they had to issue more guidelines defining a kite and how it wasn't included. Really? Not that these laws mean anything, but its against the law for the FAA to regulate commerce, so if you follow the money are they breaking any laws if they turn to a "Public/Private partnership" (The three blue blocks in your diagram) to accomplish this for them? I would argue that it is but I'm not an attorney. I would also argue that's it a conflict of interest if any of the money collected for user fees as part of the UTM could not be used to fund any part of the FAA. People justify drone registration because its only $5, that's to the registrant. The FAA has taken in almost $9M. Where did that money go and where is it being spent? How is the FAA being held accountable for such a sizable amount of money. How much is UTM going to cost to deploy? Who decided it was necessary? Why do we need LAANC? Who, if anyone, made the case for UTM? Everyone who has a financial stake in its development that's who, but the statistics don't warrant it.
    2 points
  16. Confirming that AirMap deleted that post after it created a lot of backlash for them. @Dave Pitman you're right, I think that was definitely them slipping up and stating their true mission. @Av8Chuck, had no idea NASA's UTM testing was so shaky. Can you share some links to where you read/heard about that? Would be curious to read up on it. Dave did a good job a while back checking me when I was writing about UTM and really just adopting an industry perspective without thinking about how its rollout could impact drone service providers/individual operators (hobbyists too, for that matter). Hope I'm doing a better job now—I want to write 'the facts' (what the FAA/industry reps are saying and what it seems like is happening on the testing front) but I'm trying to do better at considering whom will be impacted and what that impact might look like. Thanks for keeping me honest Dave and Chuck, know I can always count on you to share your frank thoughts.
    2 points
  17. I think the biggest hurdles are airspace and safety. The worlds airspace is so busy without throwing in new flying machines at low altitude, bad weather and [at least for now] who will fly them and how will it be regulated - will you need a pilot licence or will they introduce some new licence? Uber definitely bit off more than it could chew with their predictions, after all it is flying, even if it's based off a multi-copter design. In fact as everyone knows the multi-copter is inherently unstable and needs some nifty electronics to not fall out of the sky - now go put people in them . Obviously Airbus should be at the forefront of building a flying machine and how its integrates with current regulations/airspace, but this is certainly a new sector and will be difficult to predict progression without putting in the test flights first.
    2 points
  18. Hi Zacc, I think it is a well written summary of the current state of things, well done!
    2 points
  19. Oops, sorry. Just when I thought I was done... I realize that people generally don't agree with this, but HOBBYISTS ARE NOT DRIVING THE COMMERCIAL ADOPTION OF DRONES PERIOD! I know that people want to believe in the easy button and cheap but that's not the way markets grow. It has nothing to do with who has the best mousetrap, and everything to do with peoples eversion to the cheese. If anyone's really interested you should read Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey Moore. Its an oldie but a goody that explains the technology adoption life cycle and the hobbyists or techies role in market development. I realize that all of those Facebook geniuses think its different now but its not.
    2 points
  20. If your phone is not connecting to the app even though you are able to connect to the drone Wi-Fi, turn off the mobile data on the phone. Then reopen and reconnect and it will work.
    2 points
  21. So very cool! I grew up on a farm in Iowa. I have some cool stuff of the farm I grew up on - my uncle farms it now. Here's one I did of some silage harvest last year. I have a few more in the can too...just have to find the time to edit.
    2 points
  22. For those who want to move on and salvage what you can I have a few suggestions. Take an inventory of: Everyone who paid and what did you get, drone, website, training etc.. Anyone who paid and got nothing? Has anyone received a partial or full refund? Does anyone know how many "licensee's" there are? Is there a list? All of those who became part of DronesForce should exchange contact information. As @Patricio has started to do, everyone should exchange or post your URL [if you received one] and what was your "territory". In the commercial drone market your not likely going to be competitors. There's probably safety in numbers when it comes to sorting out what happened but more importantly in helping each other get started. I would also recommend that you segregate the issues of getting your money back versus deciding what you want to do next. Obviously you want to share as much information as possible and do all you can to recover your investment but Online that will turn into a presidential election. For those that are going through this if you received the hardware [and hopefully the website] then you can consider this an expensive education but you might still get some value from this and help the others that were screwed out of everything. There's no reason that you can't all work together to form a "Coalition" and pick up where DronesForce left off. Not saying it will be easy or ideal but it might be manageable if you work together. Try not to point the fingers at one another, don't be a victim.
    2 points
  23. I’m convinced Steven Marsh in this thread is Alex Larson Also, Arwin at Memphisuav is Alex +1 (901) 531-9799. He's going to talk in a southern accent but listen closely and you'll hear Alex. This is also true of Chris P from www.vancouver-aerial.com. +1 (778) 655-8540. He’ll talk with a Canadian accent but he’s also Alex. And finally, Eric P from Alburquerque DukeCityAerial.com +1 (505) 605-6945. I recorded all my conversations when talking with anyone related to Drones Force. I didn’t record these conversations because I was suspicious. I did it so I could review my notes when putting together a business plan. The weekend before I was going to send my $20k, I reviewed all my conversations in one sitting. That’s when it became clear to me that Alex was posing to be all these partners. I didn’t notice at first when I had these initial conversations because a week or two would pass before I had my next conversation. However, when you listen to these conversations back to back to back, it’s quite obvious that Alex is everyone. Even the so called other employees in the office. This for me was the last straw. I’m so glad I recorded these conversations. I had a lot of other concerns and saw many other red flags that moving forward was not going to be a option for me. I hope some of this information is helpful. Good luck moving forward.
    2 points
  24. A great landscape with nice weather and some clouds. Perfect credentials for a nice flying day
    1 point
  25. All I can say it that this is so cool! Very, very powerful! I wonder how well this would do in a cave environment to map it? How much does it rely on GPS signals to do what it does? Tim Luttrell
    1 point
  26. Hi Vern, welcome to the forum. It was interesting reading about your experience. I think what UAV Coach does to help people get their Part 107 is essential. I'm glad to hear that the program worked so well for you. Thanks for sharing. I think from your description your first foray into the business of drones was more on point than you might think. You were just about three or four years too early. When you consider what problems drones were solving at the time, people who approached the solution from the perspective that the "drone" is not the solution, its an enabling part of the solution were constantly ridiculed by people who wanted to argue that their white drone was better than the orange drones. The real issue confronting industry has been the transformation from analog to digital engineering. Drones can certainly play an important role in that transition but that transformation has way more to do with role 3D engineering, remote inspections texture mapped onto as-built models combined to create the Digital-Twin. If you stop to think about it when people use a Skydio to create a reality model with a low quality camera with a tiny plastic lens and compare it favorably to a drone that's carrying a 64MP camera with glass lens that can resolve down to a mm from 200ft, you just have to wonder what they're smoking? That's where forums like this can be useful. Yes this is a UAV forum but its real value to people such as yourself is its a place to have discussions about the relevance of drones in the overall solution.
    1 point
  27. Hey @Vernon Shurtz, Welcome to the UAV Coach community forum and thanks for sharing your story! It sounds like you have had an incredible career, I bet you have some great stories. Sorry to hear about your business being shut down, but it good to hear that you came back to drones. I hear you on the cold and windy conditions, I am from the midwest so I understand the frustration of not being able to fly because of the wind, it gets windy here a lot! Best of luck with your drone business and feel free to keep us updated on how it's going. - Chase
    1 point
  28. You are correct, airspace can only be regulated by the FAA. In addition, it’s not the right of the FAA to “give up” or transfer those rights without going through the public Notice for Proposed Rule Making. The airspace is public, as tax payers we own it. The FAA is responsible for the safe operation of the airspace. They can restrict access based on your qualifications but if you meet the requirements they can’t stop you from flying. I don’t think the concept of Avigation is a real thing. I am a pilot and have lived next to an airport and as a homeowner I had no rights that could restrict the operations of the airport in any way. When AirWare started its purpose was to provide a platform where businesses and home owners could log in, pay a fee to restrict overflight of their establishment and pilots would have to login and pay for permission. This is called user fees, and since tax payers pay for the NAS that’s not allowed. Having said that, it doesn’t mean that the current administration isn’t going to try.
    1 point
  29. DJI Air 2s Vs Mavic 2 Pro, a comparison in terms of video functions and quality to see if this new model has taken the place of the king of DJI prosumer drones
    1 point
  30. Hi Everyone! For any Part 107 renewal questions, feel free to check out this article: https://www.dronepilotgroundschool.com/recurrent-knowledge-test-part-107/ Please let us know if you have any questions! Best, Chase
    1 point
  31. That's hilarious. Thank you for that. The Board of Registration of Engineers and Land Surveyors IS the authority that defines what Surveying is. So they are the authority on what is and is not a survey. Like I said earlier, It sounds like sour grapes, if you want to by a drone and then provide work products that require a license, get the license, or change the law. Suing the board for not allowing competition is comical on its face, and the argument that their work product is Free Speech is almost more ridiculous. I could say... where does some standard committee get off telling people that if I drive a car I am somehow required to be licensed? I am perfectly able to drive and don't need big government stopping me. Sounds to me like the person in the article is trying to do just that, change the law. I just would not have thought to get a lawyer and sue the board for a wild charge, I would have contacted the board directly.
    1 point
  32. Even providing surface files from which any spatial data can be derived is not land surveying. Plenty of publicly available data from the USGS, online, for example.
    1 point
  33. While this is not as bad as that racist law in Georgia, it IS an infringement upon the rights of us drone operators to try to stop us from assisting real estate agents in selling their listings. I specialize in this type of drone photography and it's bad enough that we have to take that stupid Part 107 test for $150 every two years (e.g., why do we need to know what the markings on airport runways mean when we can't fly with 5 miles of an airport? Duh!). This ruling could determine whether those of us who are licensed to take drone photos for commercial use (at a great cost in time and money to study for and take their silly test) will be able to continue to make money for our services. Another case of stupid government overreach. It will merely encourage more "recreational" use for real estate photography instead of drone use by licensed pilots...
    1 point
  34. As suggested by @Av8Chuck a custom built drone would likely be the best solution for this application. There are a couple of open source flight stacks that could be used. https://ardupilot.org https://px4.io These flight stacks provide the stabilization, navigation and guidance for the drone and can be programmed with "missions" consisting of waypoints which in your case would of course be the ground sensors. Configuration, mission planning and flight monitoring is also provided by open source software running on a laptop, tablet or phone. https://ardupilot.org/planner/ http://qgroundcontrol.com The flight stacks are also very customizable and support a "companion" computer communicating via a protocol called "Mavlink". That companion computer potentially could be your small computer/router depending on the OS it runs. One example of a companion computer is the Raspberry pI which has built in WiFi and can operate as an access point so could easily be used to upload data. Also those flight stacks can control both mutli-rotor aircraft and fixed wing and in your case, depending on the required distance to travel, a fixed wing maybe the better option due its prolonged flight time. Of course it also depends how close the aircraft needs to get to the ground sensors but potentially a fixed wing could circle that location while uploading the data.
    1 point
  35. Kind of depends on what country they’re located in.
    1 point
  36. Umm.. I'm hoping that your UAS skills are better than your internet search skills? Maybe you are just trying to get you link posted? There has been a lot of that lately. If so, Google is not so naive these days. Get good at your job and people in your area will find you.
    1 point
  37. Hi everyone, Its been a while. I have my official drone pilot license. The delay was verification of my EU residency. I applied to Ireland and I live in The Netherlands. Application are expected from the country in which you are normally resident. There was a video to watch. The animated video has all the rules and regulations. You are required to watch the entire video before you get access to the exam. The 40 question exam is a 4 x multiple choice answer paper. There are sections as Chase shows in his link. When you get a question wrong in a section the programme automatically sends you to that question to try another answer. There seems to be no limit on the number of attempts. I had to deliberately give a wrong answer to discover that. To the question of 120m height limit; I selected the silly answer, 'Because birds only attack drones that fly over 120m high.' which may be true, however it was not the answer they were looking for. :-) After completing the exam you have to register. Part of the registration is proof of drone insurance. That's not mentioned in the EU Regulation documents. Once you register you get your License. You then have to register as an Operator. Your Operators number has to be fixed to your drone(s). I think that is so that when you bounce off someone's head, they can note the Operator number. Fly safe! Brian
    1 point
  38. These are dependable, modest robots which can endure a few shots (which let's face it, they will). The best thing about them is that you can purchase a great deal of extra parts for them, (for example, batteries, propellers and engines) and supplant them as you experience your learning period. When you get its hang, you'll feel significantly more certain and you'll most presumably need to leap to greater and better airplanes. 1:Hubsan H501A X4 Air 2:SIMREX X20 GPS Drone with 4K HD Camera 2-Axis Self stabilizing Gimbal 5G WiFi
    1 point
  39. I found this underwater drone collection Click Here
    1 point
  40. I wasn't aware there's a difference when it comes to registration? That's a great question. My preference would be to register as a hobbyists. On one hand if you register for recreation, build your confidence and have the opportunity for a paying gig what do you do? Do it under the table or do you re-register it commercially? On the other hand if you register commercially you always have the choice to do either. All I know was that while I was learning to fly everyone gave you some latitude to screw up when over the radio you said those infamous words, "I'm a student pilot." I still use those words occasionally and I've been a pilot for forty years... But then again aren't we always learning. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
    1 point
  41. Welcome to the forum. Ive only been to Tennessee to view a factory to manufacture UAVs in Johnson City. Looks like a great place to live. Heres a video of our trip (mostly of the current factory).
    1 point
  42. I appreciate the fast reply. Luckily I have a good place to practice and I understand the basic rules (common sense) I just wanted to make sure I'm not breaking any laws. Thanks again.
    1 point
  43. Hi Keith - Sometimes it can be tough finding good places to practice flying, especially if you live in a big city or near a major airport. I'd suggest learning a little bit about airspace and downloading an app that you can use to understand restrictions (like the kittyhawk or B4UFLY apps). The Pilot Institute has a free course for new drone pilots called the Ultimate Drone Pilot Guide. They also have a free course dedicated to the DJI Mini 2 that's pretty comprehensive.
    1 point
  44. Honestly, my music industry work kept me focused on getting this in order for my drone work product. I’d love to see courses that delve into some of the legal hurdles we face-too much lack of knowledge and good information out here. Happy New Year to you, too!
    1 point
  45. Are you on a Mac or PC? If your on a Mac the pedestal is usually raised so its less contrasty. It depends on how/if you have calibrated your monitor, what version of OSX, and whether your using the Rec709-A Quicktime tag. Read these: "Grading for Mixed Delivery: Cinema, Home, and Every Screen in Between" by Cullen Kelly https://blog.frame.io/2019/10/14/grading-mixed-delivery/ "How to Deal with Levels: Full vs. Video" by Dan Swierenga https://www.thepostprocess.com/2019/09/24/how-to-deal-with-levels-full-vs-video and "A Deeper Look at Consistent Color with QuickTime Tags From Resolve To YouTube & Vimeo on Wide Gamut Apple Monitors" by Dan Swierenga https://www.thepostprocess.com/2020...i-resolve-to-the-internet-with-quicktime-tags and I think they cover the issues and the solutions very well. Understanding color management is also helpful: "Color Management for Video Editors" https://jonnyelwyn.co.uk/film-and-video-editing/colour-management-for-video-editors/
    1 point
  46. Those shots are amazing. I really like how some very creative people incorporate technology into their art. Not just in using the technology to create the art but also integrating it into the art. This is very cool.
    1 point
  47. There's the PowerRay Wizard, not sure it qualifies as "cheap" though.
    1 point
  48. 1 point