Alan Perlman

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Posts posted by Alan Perlman


  1. Hi there @DroneWizard, thanks for posting and welcome to our forum.

    Yes, there are regulations, but for recreational pilots they are relatively straightforward, and I would hope that you wouldn't have too much trouble learning where you can fly.

    Not sure how close you are to Virginia Beach, but here are a few places we scouted out that are good areas to fly:

    https://uavcoach.com/where-to-fly-drone/virginia-beach/

    Happy to answer any specific questions you have about U.S. drone regulations!


  2. Hi @Trish — congrats on getting certified. I use an iPad mini 4 with wifi+cellular, and the size makes it so that it JUST fits and does not require an additional mounting bracket. I've been enjoying it quite a bit, though I've also been told that the new smart controller is 100% worth the investment. No additional cords and a brighter screen. But the advantage of the iPad mini is that you can run other apps on it — DroneDeploy, Litchi, etc.

    Hope that helps!

    • Thanks 1

  3. Yah, this is a super loaded (but always fun to wax philosophical on) question.

    Replace "drone pilot" with "painter" — there are licensed and insured painters that get stuck in Craiglist / Thumbtack-land where it's a race to the bottom, and the painter can only sustain small paying gigs here and there. But then there are painters who stick with it and keep honing their craft. They know more than all other painters in their local geography. They've built a large network, have an impressive portfolio, online marketing presence and offline sales process and strong client delivery SOPs. They're painting commercial buildings and getting longer-term and larger contracts.

    OK, maybe not the best analogy, but I'm trying :) There are a myriad of opportunities out there. But, just getting certified and buying a drone won't get you any business. There's no easy money in this (or any service-based?) industry.

    It's the months and months and months of networking and business-building that'll make one pilot successful vs. another. I continue to be amazed by our students that are out there hustling and finding great work. The opportunities are out there. But they won't be handed to you on a silver platter.

    • Like 1

  4. 20 hours ago, Bruce Hartwell said:

     Please note, I am not advocating a complete elimination of all restrictions, I am advocating a fair access and use policy that would allow camera drones to operate with the purpose of recreational photography in areas and in ways that do not unreasonably impact other visitors, wildlife and local manned aircraft. 

     

    Amen to this — I'd love to see an opportunity to get some kind of drone permit rather than a blanket ban, which we're seeing far too many of at the local level like this.


  5. 12 hours ago, Jane said:

    Hello @Alan Perlman, I will be in Kauai next month and am researching the same question - where can and can't I fly my drone. Are you able to update this feed with your experience from last year? Thank you so much! Cheers, Jane 

    Hey, definitely check out Shipwreck Beach. It's an approachable hike and a great spot to fly! Watch out for wind gusts :)

    I also found a couple of lookout points in the Princeville area that were fun to fly. There was a huge flood the week before we got there, so a lot of the island wasn't accessible and I couldn't explore as much as I would've liked, but some good spots to fly.

    Avoid the state parks! That's the big rule in the state of Hawaii.

    • Like 1

  6. Hi @aziz alenzi , thanks for posting. When the industry was starting to open up in the U.S. back in 2014-2015, I spent a lot of time on the phone with people. I asked them questions about what training they were looking for, how they planned to use drones, etc. I would highly recommend doing the same in Saudia Arabia to get a sense of what the local market demands are. You're lucky in that there are more mature sUAS markets like the U.S., the U.K., Australia, Canada, and many others with existing training companies. You can look to see how others are positioning themselves and what kinds of products and services are being offered, then adapt those to your local market.

    What you're talking about doing is not easy. It's going to be insanely difficult, and my guess is that there are already dozens and dozens of people trying to do the exact same thing, so you'll need to stay focused and to move quickly and persistently.

    I hope this helps! Best of luck and let us know how things go along the way.