Spitfire76

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Posts posted by Spitfire76

  1. 6 hours ago, erfan said:

    So you mean when a flight controller wants to control a function (rectractable  landing gear) Then a servo*_function needs to be mapped ,right?

    Let's take a step back and continue to use the retractable landing gear as an example as I've had experience in setting that up. Firstly you have to of course know what is type of signal is required by the landing gear hardware for it to deploy and retract. In my case the landing gear controller required a PWM signal. Originally I did not have this driven from the flight controller but simply use one of the spare PWM outputs of the receiver which was in turn mapped to a switch on my transmitter. This worked but what would have happened if my drone lost the transmitter signal and the failsafe action was RTL  or land ?. If the landing gear was retracted when this occurred there is no way to deploy it before it landed unless I could regain control over the drone. So this is the case when you want the flight controller to drive the PWM to the landing gear controller as the ArdCopter code does deploy it before it lands. Of course you also want to retract and deploy it from a switch on the transmitter. I used the first aux pins and so SERVO9_FUNCTION was set to landing gear and also CHXX_OPT was set to landing gear where XX was the sbus channel I was using from the receiver. 

  2. On 10/9/2019 at 10:29 PM, UnoMatt said:

    Started to build a 3d printed drone with UNO.   From what I've seen no one uses a PDB since they use a built frame with PDB installed.  I see they use resistors from the battery to the UNO.  Since i'm using a PDB I shouldn't have to use resistors correct? 

    Also I see they don't plug the ESC's into the receiver.  Rather into the UNO.  Then output from receiver to UNO?  How would i wire that?  Cut the ESC to receiver wire and solder into UNO?  There doesn't seem to be any step by step on how to do this.

    Hello @UnoMatt and welcome to the Forum. Not sure how to answer your question but it may help me if you explain a bit more about your project. It looks like you are building a flight controller from scratch using an Arduino Uno. 8 bit processors were first used in early flight controllers but these days 32 bit processors are mainly used. For example the open source Ardupilot software that I use for my drones was originally designed to work on Arduino processors, hence the "ardu" in the name but the software evolved so much it required more memory and processing power and several years ago the Arduino hardware was abandoned in favor of 32 bit arm processors.

    So what software were you planning on using in your project or were you going to write your own ?

     

     

  3. 17 minutes ago, erfan said:

    I was only curious and wanted to know What and where are the 15.16 channels for.

    Only having 1-14 channels for servo outputs is likely is due to having a limit of 14 PWM outputs on the original Pixhawk hardware (8 main + 6 AUX).

    As you may know the 16 channels coming from the receiver need to be allocated to various functions. Some of these functions map to servo functions and some do not. For example RTL does not map to a servo function but needs an input channel from the receiver to trigger it. On the other hand landing gear needs both a channel from the receiver and a servo output. Also rather than just directly mapping a receiver input channel to a servo output (passthru) you may want the flight controller to also control that function. A good example is the case of retractable landing gear as you would likely want it to automatically deploy before it lands in the case of RTL or have a mission script control that function. So don't think of the servo output functions correspond to the receiver input channel as they are really separated. 

    53 minutes ago, erfan said:

    Do you know how  can I use the AUX 5 and 6 to turn on some led lights alternating?

    AUX5 and 6 are digital pins.

    These should by default (BRD_PWM_COUNT = 4) be assigned as digital output rather than PWM servo functions outputs which by the way also means that servo channels 13 and 14 and not used by default in addition to 15 and 16. in this case aux5 and 6 correspond to the first and second relays and can be operated by a receiver channel or a mission script. 

    http://ardupilot.org/copter/docs/common-relay.html

  4. 7 hours ago, erfan said:

    but where do I connect the servo for example to check if I get the signal from that specific output ?

    On the side of the flight controller that has the 8 main and 6 aux outputs there should be 2 more connections. One is marked RC which is the sbus connection from the receiver and the other is marked SB which is the sbus out. This should contain all 16 servo function outputs but it has to be connected to a device that understands the sbus protocol. For example I have a camera gimbal that has a controller with a sbus input so can allocate 2 channels to pitch and pan. If you want to control a device that only understands a PWM input you would need to use a sbus to PWM convertor.

    So have you used up all 14 PWM outputs ?. Again what are you really trying to configure ?.

  5. 11 hours ago, erfan said:

    Hello ,
    on the pixhawk we have 8 channels related to main out (CH1-8) + 6 Aux out (CH9-14).
    so in total there is 14 channels. Which I can see the PWM outputs using mission planner when doing radio calibration.

    So my question is where are the 15th and 16th channels ? 
    and how to assign them to specific command? 


    Thanks 

    @Spitfire76

    I believe that they would be available on the sbus output of the pixhawk and you would configure them with SERVO15_FUNCTION and SERVO16_FUNCTION. What exactly do you need to do ?

  6. 41 minutes ago, Scott switzer said:

    Building a 250 race drone ordered a naze 32 rev 6 should get it today can it still be programmed or should i send it back

    When you say "programmed" I assume that you mean flashed with flight controller software so the approach I would take is to first decide what software you want to use and see if the board is supported. Since the software is constantly being improved it typically requires more memory and processing power and older boards may no longer be supported with later versions. I believe that Betaflight is the most popular flight controller software for FPV racing so I would start here.

    https://github.com/betaflight/betaflight/wiki

     

  7. 11 hours ago, Scott switzer said:

    Was gona start out with a naze 32 controler but herd they couldnt be programmed anymore is that true 

    While I believe that controller was good in its day there is a lot more choice available today. Are you planning on building a drone and if so what do you want to use it for ?

  8. Hello @MarcusJubin - great to see another drone builder join the forum. The only component on your list that I am familiar with is the Holybro Kakute F7 flight controller and I really like it. I should point out that I am not using it for racing or freestyle but as an economical flight controller to run http://ardupilot.org open source software. The main features that I like is the separated IMU board which means you can mount the main board directly on the frame without vibration dampers. I also like the serial ports can be inverted which means I can directly connect to frisky s.port for telemetry.

  9. 22 hours ago, Spitfire76 said:

    The CEO of Skydio, Adam Bry, joined today's live DSTW episode (he joined at 53 mins in)

    Correction to my previous post - its more like 1h 37 mins into the youtube video.

     

     

  10. On 9/29/2019 at 10:38 AM, Av8Chuck said:

    the Cube is a good flight controller but it’s not as advertised.  That “H” logo on every Cube is a Chinese manufacturer. They can claim that the Blue Cube is made in the USA but in the long run it will probably not pass muster with the DoD.

    @Av8Chuck, I don't see in @bhhagai original post a need for an USA manufactured flight controller so this maybe a non-issue for this thread but I am interested in what you say about the cube. What I understood is that the Blue Cube is identical to the black cube but is manufactured in California's bay area instead of Taiwan and due to the higher labor costs is double the price ($500) of the black cube. Are you saying that this is false ?

    383335449_ScreenShot2019-10-01at8_33_36AM.thumb.png.4df3c4134628c92bfe5ca14e34e8aa8c.png

  11. 2 hours ago, erfan said:

    am looking for a power module for my pixhawk,
    my hexacopter draws more than 150-160 AMps .
    Any one has any suggestion?

    I would suggest using Mauch Power Modules as these use hall-effect sensors for current sensing that is more accurate than others that measure voltage change across a low ohm resistor. I believe that they can also support multiple batteries as well as a redundant power distribution configuration.

    http://ardupilot.org/copter/docs/common-mauch-power-modules.html

    https://www.mauch-electronic.com/apps/webstore/

  12. Hello @bhhagai and welcome to this forum. I assume that you are using the RPi as a companion computer connected via a serial connection to the flight controller.

    http://ardupilot.org/dev/docs/raspberry-pi-via-mavlink.html

    I imagine that the cellular modem would be connected to the RPi to provide command, telemetry and possibly a video stream from a camera connected to the PI.

    I don't have one of these but you may want to check into this CubePilot (Pixhawk 2.1) carrier board 

    https://dronee.aero/pages/lychee

    I like the idea of being able to replace not only the Cube Flight Controller but also the Raspberry Pi module while keeping the carrier board. This is of course important when it comes to upgrading either of these modules. There is already a  number of Cube flight controller available including the Blue one which is made in the USA

    https://docs.cubepilot.org/user-guides/autopilot/the-cube-module-overview

    • Like 1
  13. On 9/7/2019 at 6:07 PM, Tom-22 said:

    I am pretty sure this is a good configuration, but I would appreciate any thoughts and/or ideas to improve or tweak it.

    Hello @Tom-22 and welcome to the forum. I have a build using the S550 frame, its a good frame but I would prefer to mount the batterie/s on top of the frame rather than underneath but there is not enough space between the center plates to install a flight controller the size of the 2.4.8 Pixhawk. I am currently experimenting with using a small flight controller on another build that I have using a S500 quad frame. I am using this controller

    http://www.holybro.com/product/kakute-f7/

    Its really meant for a small racing quad but ArduCopter software can now run on these types of boards. 

    http://ardupilot.org/copter/docs/common-autopilots.html

    Since it fits between the center plates of the frame I can install the gimbal/camera in the center underneath the quad and the battery on top. I am also looking into using 2 batteries as I found the flight time using one 3s 5200 mAh battery quite limiting. 

    As you will see from this thread I've been messing around with these frame for a few years. I just like to tinker :)

     

     

  14. I can see why Zipline is number 1 as they have been providing medical delivery service  by drone for several years. Altough they are a US company their delivery service is primarily been provided in Rwanda. I recently came across this video that shows some interesting engineering design choices that they made.

     

  15. 3 hours ago, PilotEd said:

    Watched this review video of the Herelink controller just now, Bobby showed us the video transmission got a little bit breakout when the distance went up to 1600 feet. Is it normal since they stated that its range is 20km in FCC mode?

    I believe that Bobby did say that the video breakup could have been due to the proximity of the electrical power lines.