victorbravo77

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victorbravo77 last won the day on April 6

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  1. Yes, I concur with what you say. I have productively worked with many surveyors who spend inordinate amounts of time chasing title and metes-and-bounds descriptions. But, any good public university offers coursework in how to build maps and maybe has a department of Geography. I don't think it is a simple matter at all and I hope you won't take issue with my comment. I think Av8Chuck is right. Maybe that's why my prices are so high
  2. Even providing surface files from which any spatial data can be derived is not land surveying. Plenty of publicly available data from the USGS, online, for example.
  3. Acquiring imagery is not land surveying. It can be definitely a useful part, but it is not conducting a licensed survey. My drone flights are conducted with the objective of doing photogrammetry i.e. precision aerial photography. I know of no state licensure program for a photogrammatrist. Even if I collate all the spatial data and generate maps, it is not surveying. Greg V. makes a very salient point that an x-ray technician is not a radiologist and has no business practicing medicine. But, guaranteed, the radiologist can't effectively do their jobs without an image technician. Moreover, having worked with many land surveyors over the years, no state-licensed surveyor would be able to do their work without the instrument person, rod person, and note-taker, that is, the field crew acquiring the data. Do they all have to have a surveyor's license? With all due respect to my many friends in The Old North State, this sounds like government over-reach in a state that is decidely against government over-reach. I hope Mr. Jones succeeds decisively. Photogrammetry - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Photogrammetry
  4. Mr. Fenigsohn, I am interested in test flights using your platform. I am happy to provide a CV and particulars upon request. Part 107 certified in NYS since 2016. Contact at info@brightbluemarble.com
  5. Apparently another, earlier post of mine did not make it. No, you don't need "type certificates" or other sUAS license. However, I have found great benefit in learing as much about drones, their histories, flight planning and their limitations by taking coursework through Emby-Riddle's Online Campus. Their coursework is pricey, no doubt, but thorough and rewarding. If you want to learn about small unmanned aircraft systems (beyond 15 CFR Part 107), this is a good start: https://www.enrole.com/erau/jsp/index.jsp?categoryId=5580C1C0
  6. Oh, and having finished Alan's coursework, the faculty of ERAU will certainly appreciate your input. I know they did mine.
  7. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU.edu) offers great small unmanned aircraft system coursework through their office of professional education, Worldwide campus.
  8. The offer just below the return shipping cost to me was downright insulting. I mentioned it to them ... politely 🙂
  9. I'll add that there is no way to have many accessories like prop guards or floats (NIB) estimated online.
  10. Not at all. I sent the a/c in for appraisal. In short, cost to me was $4-6 to keep my own unit. Heed my warning.
  11. Just a side note. After Isabella's somewhat recent article about the Autel trade in program, I went a-looking for some others and found DJI's. I have a low-time, older Phantom 3 that I basically started videography with but that I haven't flow in years. For credit toward a newer model of DJI product, the DJI trade-up program offers credit for a new DJI product by trading in an older model; the cost for you to ship to them is free (they will email you a shipping label). I sent a Phantom 3 standard with an unused float kit, two new batteries and four propeller guards (with eight serviceable propellers), charger, cables, transmitter, prop hub guards and the minor accessory kit. Their initial estimate was 97.00$US. The a/c has about four very local flights and is low time. I sent the gear and their reply was yep, we'll give you credit for a new DJI device in the amount of 27.50(?)! Mind you I would have to pay $35 to $40 to have my gear returned. I have a number of aircraft in my fleet and have owned this P3 since early 2016. It has been "For Sale" in a couple of forums for 18 months(?), but I wanted to warn you about the trade-up program. I am Part 107 certified. My hindsight is your 20-20 vision, I hope. Thanks for reading. VB77
  12. Congrats, Alan and your team! I also always look forward to your weekly newsletter. Thank you too for your training and support! V.
  13. Good advice on practice. Training flights are FUN! Each maneuver is scalable. Circularizing your flight, especially in tight regimes, is the toughest! This is by courtesy of Scott Burgess, PhD, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and their small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) program. Have fun, and to borrow from Scott Manley (youtube - DSnM), "Fly Safe!" Basic maneuvers to practice to proficiency: Square flight pattern with aircraft heading away at all times Square flight pattern with aircraft facing toward at all times Square flight pattern with aircraft pointing into the square at all times Circle flight pattern around the square with the camera continuously pointing at the center at all times
  14. Make the quad a hexacopter. Evolution of flight, and all that. And, leave the dates out(?) It's relative.