Slinger2

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  1. Thanks. Actually the sling tip need not be traveling particularly fast, it is basically on the same order as the UAV's speed, plus or minus a bit. I think 1/800 shutter speed is plenty fast enough. Think oscillation periods on the order of many seconds. One neat application demonstrated in technical papers is that you can use a sling to actually come to rest at a point - and fly a fixed wing UAV in circles around it. Whatever can be done from a fixed wing, we should be able to better with a rotary wing, except fly at high Mach number.
  2. Great questions, thanks. 1. The speed of the arc can be controlled by UAV motion, just like the logger helo pilots have learned to deposit their logs accurately into trucks. Takes a bit of practice, but we have tried this in the lab with a simple kinematic arrangement, and within days students learned to execute some amazing maneuvers, very precisely : like sticking a cellotape piece to a doll at the end of the swing and thus grabbing it, without it falling off or being pushed away. One would presumably add sensors, then again, cellphones today already have those sensors! 2. Post-pr
  3. Thanks! Alan, hoping to get some comments from you.. From what we see, slung loads are typically associated with a) big military cargos (CONEX, HumVees, all sorts and shapes of other things) that have to be moved fast over places where you don't want to dilly-dally b) Moving a groggy rhinoceros (Google that one, I am not kidding) or skycrane applications where slow and steady is the order of the day as you lower the top half of a tower onto the bottom half for an Alaskan WiFi network. c) Logging ops where pilots have learned to do dynamic, swinging loading onto a truck without
  4. Thanks, all very helpful! FYI, we have flight-tested a small (<$200) quadrotor with a 4lb box some 15 to 30 feet beneath it in a casual "let's try this at the park b4 anyone wakes up) and gone at fair speeds (est. 30mph-plus). Perfectly smooth without bringing in any of our exotic technology. Large pizza box is harder, but doable. Also, now over the terror of OMG! A Tree! Nice sound the rotors make as they cut through foliage in front of our (organization's) President's Office. Perfectly legal, mind you, flight only above Green Space, no humans underneath. One observation: Current pro
  5. I'll ask out in public what I have been asking a few people in private: Anyone using slung loads with UAVs? For background, I am asking because we work in improving the accuracy of predicting slung load aerodynamics (all sorts of shapes!) speed and safety. One advantage is immediately apparent: You put a large pizza box (quite light) under a small quadrotor and you block the rotor wakes. You sling it 10 feet below or 20 feet below, and the drone does not have to come down to whether people/pets and drones won't hurt each other, and you can deliver the pizza without even hovering. But obviously
  6. This interview is a goldmine! Thanks very much for posting it, and thanks of course to the participants. We have been talking to fire and law enforcement people in Metro Atlanta and have been accumulating some great information on how departments are looking at these systems. Key insight: "Information is a force multiplier". They see sending out UAVs from trucks, so that they kept in line of sight, as opposed to sending a large UAS which may be too expensive, rare and poses a bigger crash risk. Would love to communicate with you guys to clear up a couple of things, but in any event, thanks ve
  7. Greetings. I am one of two members of a team from Atlanta, Georgia trying to learn about using drones for slung load delivery in various applications. My teammate will register and introduce himself as soon as he gets off the phone talking to firefighters in Hawaii. In our usual work we conduct experimental research on the aerodynamics of helicopters, slung loads, and multiple rotors in general. Hope to talk to all of you, particularly anyone who will talk to us about drones used with slung loads, drones used in delivery, slung loads with helicopters, and the business of drones in general. Saf