JeffTheDronePilot

airmap, skyward, class e identification

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Here is a feedback from a flight operation I did last week in the vicinity of Okkechobee County Airport in Florida :

I had a client requesting a flight in the vicinity of a non towered airport.

- Checked on Airmap : No airspace class mentionned, so I assumed it was class G

- Checked on Skyvector : class E

I Called the airport manager, which filled a NOTAM for me, and I conducted my operation successfully while planes were taking of and landing… sometime over my flying zone. Next time I will use a 2 way radio in order to be able to monitor the air traffic. My issue is that both Airmap and Skyward are supposed to show class E airspace on the maps, but in reality they only show class B, C and D. From my understanding, non towered airports are in class E airspace (see below).

So why Airmap and Skyward are not showing Okeechobee County Airport as a class E airport?

Thanks for your help guys!!

Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 6.17.07 PM.png

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First of all, to clarify, not all non-towered airports are in class e airspace.  As an example, there are 3 airports in my location, all non towered, and one is class e (700 agl).  The closest to me is class e sfc from 0600-2200 local time and the third one is the same.  But guess what, that third one on Sundays is class g untill 1100 local time.  Now the only way you get accurate info is to follow the FAA chart supplements.  For example, the sectional for KSSI, my closest airport, shows class e sfc but there is a note to check for class e sfc hours.  The chart supplement is where you get all that.  I cant speak to the way Skyward and Airmap show their airport data and it would be best to go direct to them.  I'm pretty sure that is part of the reason I cancelled my membership to Skyward a while back.

In any case, if you were in class e airspace with a 700 ft agl floor, you didn't need to notify anyone at all.  You are cleared to 400ft and that's a benefit of a Part 107 Certificate.

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Thanks Ed!

Thanks to your comment I found where my mistake was coming from. I Thought Okeechobee County Airport was a sfc class E, but it wasn't! it was class E from 700 ft AGL, and that's why it wasn't showed on Airmap or Skyward which are only showing airspaces below 500ft.

I asked the same question to Airmap and SKyward and their answer was unclear...

Maybe I can ask you what do you think of the class B limits which are very precise or those apps and much less precise on a sectional chart (originaly designed for Planes). Exemple in Miami class B : the east limits are shown over the land on Airmap and SKyward where as they are shown over the shore on the sectional charts...

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Well again Jeff I can't speak to the accuracy of Airmap and Skyward.  Sectional charts coupled with NOTAMS and the FAA Chart supplements should be your source of info.  I can also tell you that if you were to be questioned by an FAA inspector, he does not care about proprietary mapping services.  

Re KMIA, there is a 6nm radius of Class B airspace.  As you pass that boundary heading east or west, you transition to Class B  airspace with a floor of 1500 ft and that extends out to 10 nm. Below 1500 it appears to be Class G (out over the water) so you are good to go.  Not sure if that answers your question.  If not let's try again!

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On 2/13/2017 at 6:44 PM, JeffTheDronePilot said:

Maybe I can ask you what do you think of the class B limits which are very precise or those apps and much less precise on a sectional chart (originaly designed for Planes). Exemple in Miami class B : the east limits are shown over the land on Airmap and SKyward where as they are shown over the shore on the sectional charts...

Jeff,

It boils down to this. Are you going to rely on an app or are you going to rely on the FAA? They teach you to read a sectional chart for a reason. That is the source the FAA is providing to general aviation and UAS operators. Apps are all well and fine, but the information in the chart is what you will be held accountable for. It is, after all, direct from the governing body that controls the NAS.

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