FAA Waiver-Airspace Authorization


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I have several non-towered airports in my area along with several heliports.  Two questions:  1. Do I need to submit a FAA Waiver when flying within 5 miles of these locations?  and, 2. If so, what do I put for class of airspace?  I do have a part 107 license.

Any suggestions/recommendations would be appreciated. 

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54 minutes ago, ForProps said:

I have several non-towered airports in my area along with several heliports.  Two questions:  1. Do I need to submit a FAA Waiver when flying within 5 miles of these locations?  and, 2. If so, what do I put for class of airspace?  I do have a part 107 license.

Any suggestions/recommendations would be appreciated. 

The information you provided is way too generic to answer your question. Specifics are needed and a sectional wouldn't hurt. If the airports are non-towered I would assume that they are Class E airspace but does it extend to the surface or not in the area you plan on flying in? If so, yes you would need an airspace AUTHORIZATION (not waiver) to operate within Class E airspace. Otherwise, a letter of agreement between you and the airport manager/tower might be all that is necessary.

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2 hours ago, R Martin said:

The information you provided is way too generic to answer your question. Specifics are needed and a sectional wouldn't hurt. If the airports are non-towered I would assume that they are Class E airspace but does it extend to the surface or not in the area you plan on flying in? If so, yes you would need an airspace AUTHORIZATION (not waiver) to operate within Class E airspace. Otherwise, a letter of agreement between you and the airport manager/tower might be all that is necessary.

R Martin,

Thanks for your prompt reply.  I have attached a sectional map of the area.  The small airport of concern is Toledo Surburban (DUH).  

Thanks again.

Toledo Area Sectional.jpeg

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The 5 mile radius notification for airports/heliports is a rule for hobbyists, not P107 operators. 

In the sectional I'm seeing above is cropped in too close to see the surrounding area so I looked it up on http://www.iflightplanner.com/AviationCharts/Default.aspx?Home=1

Sometimes, airspace can overlap large areas so I like to be able to look at the whole thing. It looks to be Class G airspace from surface to 400FT AGL around DUH. TOL to the southwest has class C from surface up around the inner magenta ring and some surface class E pops out from the class C of TOL - flight inside the inner magenta would require FAA approval. Otherwise it looks like you are clear to fly near DUH without notice to ATC. However, it wouldn't hurt to notify them of start/stop time for your operation if you see a lot of air traffic.

Look up your local airport facility map, it should have the airport managers number to call.

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56 minutes ago, Steve Bennett said:

The 5 mile radius notification for airports/heliports is a rule for hobbyists, not P107 operators. 

In the sectional I'm seeing above is cropped in too close to see the surrounding area so I looked it up on http://www.iflightplanner.com/AviationCharts/Default.aspx?Home=1

Sometimes, airspace can overlap large areas so I like to be able to look at the whole thing. It looks to be Class G airspace from surface to 400FT AGL around DUH. TOL to the southwest has class C from surface up around the inner magenta ring and some surface class E pops out from the class C of TOL - flight inside the inner magenta would require FAA approval. Otherwise it looks like you are clear to fly near DUH without notice to ATC. However, it wouldn't hurt to notify them of start/stop time for your operation if you see a lot of air traffic.

Look up your local airport facility map, it should have the airport managers number to call.

Thanks for the response.  Just a quick question.  How did you determine the 400' AGL instead of 700' AGL?  

As a side note, I actually took my P107 test there.  

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1 hour ago, R Martin said:

Https://skyvector.com

You should have SkyVector bookmarked. Invaluable flight planning tool.

2j3.jpg.d65a79d8d9fbf246dbcb77c83a03ee91.jpg

Oh yeah! Forgot skyvector has facility info too. I honestly use both, but iflight more frequently since you can switch to satellite view and project airspace class boundaries over it and get fairly close in, way more than the terminal area charts let you. 

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2 hours ago, Steve Bennett said:

Oh yeah! Forgot skyvector has facility info too. I honestly use both, but iflight more frequently since you can switch to satellite view and project airspace class boundaries over it and get fairly close in, way more than the terminal area charts let you. 

The FAA has also digitized sectionals for use in ArcGIS and AutoDesk, BUT I have found that the sectional I use has scaling issues and is not accurate. I wound up creating my own file geodatabase for flight planning in this area for ArcGIS that has all the pertinent airports and airspace classes as well as overlays and job outputs to keep track of what I have mapped and update our basemap. Also add CoAs and jobsite long/lats to speed the process up for filing my NOTAMs and other metrics.

Added iFlight to my planning site list too. Thanks for that!

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52 minutes ago, R Martin said:

...I wound up creating my own file geodatabase for flight planning in this area for ArcGIS that has all the pertinent airports and airspace classes as well as overlays and job outputs to keep track of what I have mapped and update our basemap. Also add CoAs and jobsite long/lats to speed the process up for filing my NOTAMs and other metrics.

Added iFlight to my planning site list too. Thanks for that!

Geez, are you my twin? lol :D

I did same thing for many of my local airports but I don't keep it as up to date as I should. Glad I was able to help you find another tool.

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2 hours ago, Steve Bennett said:

Geez, are you my twin? lol :D

I did same thing for many of my local airports but I don't keep it as up to date as I should. Glad I was able to help you find another tool.

Our area is really pretty simple. We fall under the regional airport's Class D airspace and can basically ignore everything else. The main problem I face is keeping everything straight. I have three separate tracts that I operate on so planning flights is hard to keep straight. I am a visual type so if it is displayed before my eyes, I can do what I need to do and plan my flights without overtaxing my limited cranial resources. That, and I can export a map of my accomplishments each month or so and fill up some white space on the wall.

iFlight is really sweet. You can display the airspace from a sectional over the top of a satellite image so there is no question where you are planning to operate. I didn't get the from a sectional, which is why I made my own in ArcGIS. Add to that that you have all the preflight weather briefing stuff in the same GUI, heaven. 

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13 hours ago, Steve Bennett said:

Hehehe, i just noticed I can load weather on iflight, thanks for tip. Only thing that I don't see iflight display is notams and drotams.

Trust the source:

NOTAMs  https://pilotweb.nas.faa.gov/PilotWeb/

TFRs  http://tfr.faa.gov/tfr2/list.html

If these aren't the most up to date, then you just can't get the information.

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