Alan Perlman

Who will be going to Interdrone in Las Vegas?

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22 minutes ago, Robert Biggs said:

The "new" guy???

Anyway...haha

Sorry, Robert, no offense meant.  It just said Newbie under your name and 4 posts.

What's shameless about your plug?  I didn't know what you did and enjoyed checking out your website.  I love the name of one of the buildings, the "Tilted Kilt."  

 

We have several active real estate and property videos threads: 

 

Would love to not only get your thoughts about what others are doing but also learn more about what you doing and what's worked the way you thought it would and what's different than you thought it would be relative to your drone business.

Enjoy the show.

  

4 hours ago, Alan Perlman said:

Great turnout, you were missed!

Sorry I didn't make it, would have really liked to meet everyone.  Alan are you in the LA area anytime soon?

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Great show!

Exhibit hall was fantastic! (wish it opened a little earlier than 10:45...)

Almost too much info and gear to keep track of. Came home with a tote bag full of brochures.

Hit 3-4 sessions a day and all were very informative, by Friday I think my brain was overloaded. Normally you attend these things with the hope to come away with any info...this one had too much. Had three people in my group, and we were only able to attend a session together a few times. Great classes.

Most of all...meeting and connecting with the other attendees. Finding others with new solutions to the same problems and fresh ideas on how to do the day to day stuff was the biggest take away for me. Got lots of cards and am hoping to connect as the year goes on.

And last of all..great to meet you Alan! finally got a chance to say hi and thank you for the help in passing my RPC test. Like I told you, the course gave me invaluable help and made it easy to get through the material, in the short time I had to do it, and pass the test on the first attempt. So yeah, thanks!

-Mark

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@Mark Allen, great to meet you and so many others in this community as well.

I enjoyed getting to know our remote team a little better, networking with you all, and learning about public safety operations. A lot more police and fire department representation this year!

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InterDrone 2017, I can’t say enough about the information, ideals, direction, etc. shared there!  I would recommend attending next year’s event to anyone who plans on being around unmanned aircrafts in years to come.

It was great meeting Alan and some of his team members!  Folks, he’s the same in-person as you have seen him online.  I actually heard his laughter first before actually seeing him.   

One thing I took away for the conference that got me attention was the term, “Autonomous”.  It was thrown out in a number of presentations, showing how an autonomous drone would be a better application than a RPIC in certain situation.  However, it had me wondering if “dumbing-down” UAV’s is a good thing at this early stage on introduction into air-apace.  While there were discussions in some the workshops I attended about get their work force Part 107 trained and certified, other just spoke about putting fleets of autonomous (programmed) UAV’s out on assigned missions.   

What do you think, am I over thinking “the good, the bad, the ugly” possibilities here?

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3 hours ago, FlyingRaider said:

It was great meeting Alan and some of his team members!  Folks, he’s the same in-person as you have seen him online.  I actually heard his laughter first before actually seeing him.   

Haha, Donnie. Was great meeting you as well.

What most folks seem to miss with these birds, and I know everyone reading this thread will agree, is that operating an sUAS is a lot different than it was, say, 5 years ago. It's less manual proficiency, even though that's still incredibly important and many folks skip basic flight proficiency training, and more monitoring the automation that's happening. Meaning, a truly professional pilot not only can fly manually, but also has this intimate relationship with the whole system and knows the various intelligent flight modes, fail safes, etc. inside and out. Many people think that just because they can turn left and right and fly in circles, that they're pro pilots. That's part of it, but knowing the full system and understanding the user manual at an expert level, that can take some time.

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3 hours ago, FlyingRaider said:

One thing I took away for the conference that got me attention was the term, “Autonomous”.  It was thrown out in a number of presentations, showing how an autonomous drone would be a better application than a RPIC in certain situation.  However, it had me wondering if “dumbing-down” UAV’s is a good thing at this early stage on introduction into air-apace.  While there were discussions in some the workshops I attended about get their work force Part 107 trained and certified, other just spoke about putting fleets of autonomous (programmed) UAV’s out on assigned missions.   

 

What do you think, am I over thinking “the good, the bad, the ugly” possibilities here?

 

Autonomous flight is not a bad thing. The software controlling the UAS is at times more accurate than a human at the controls. Most of our mapping flights are all autonomous. Altitude and heading management are much more accurate that way.

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5 hours ago, R Martin said:

Autonomous flight is not a bad thing. The software controlling the UAS is at times more accurate than a human at the controls. Most of our mapping flights are all autonomous. Altitude and heading management are much more accurate that way.

I agree with you that autonomous in not a bad thing, to say the least.  What I am trying to say is that safety and training in some of the presentations seem to be pushed to the back burner for some, not all, companies that may be moving in this direction.  One presentation I attended, the presenter was from the construction site side, and his words were, "I want my results, not a show, just give me what I need"!

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1 minute ago, FlyingRaider said:

I agree with you that autonomous in not a bad thing, to say the least.  What I am trying to say is that safety and training in some of the presentations seem to be pushed to the back burner for some, not all, companies that may be moving in this direction.  One presentation I attended, the presenter was from the construction site side, and his words were, "I want my results, not a show, just give me what I need"!

The need for information is balanced against how much money is it going to cost me to get that information.....I run into the problem frequently. They (the collective data-consumers et.al.) want the information collected but they don't want their job site shut down to do it. So I plan as best as I can and do it during lunch when the weather is on my side or I go back to the older methods of manually walking the site with a GPS unit and taking far longer than I care to spend on site. 

Many times subs are covering the exposed lines up as fast as they can after laying it (a violation of their contract) so gathering actionable data by UAS is just not feasible. The industry has a long way to go before this is a viable option to replace the standard methods. Until then, I'm glad I have students to fill the gaps.

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6 hours ago, Alan Perlman said:

Haha, Donnie. Was great meeting you as well.

What most folks seem to miss with these birds, and I know everyone reading this thread will agree, is that operating an sUAS is a lot different than it was, say, 5 years ago. It's less manual proficiency, even though that's still incredibly important and many folks skip basic flight proficiency training, and more monitoring the automation that's happening. Meaning, a truly professional pilot not only can fly manually, but also has this intimate relationship with the whole system and knows the various intelligent flight modes, fail safes, etc. inside and out. Many people think that just because they can turn left and right and fly in circles, that they're pro pilots. That's part of it, but knowing the full system and understanding the user manual at an expert level, that can take some time.

"Basic Flight Proficiency Training, I have suggested this to different individuals over the past six months, offering information on how it improved my flight handling skills.  The comeback for most of them, "I don't need to know all that".  I now know 5 of them, new sUAS owners (2 DJI Phantom 3, 3 DJI Phantom 4) that have crashed and burned within their first 30-days of ownership.  There's something about being in the know! "SOP, SOP,SOP"!

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8 hours ago, trevsdad said:

Alan...good to meet you and your team at InterDrone. Too bad it was Friday instead of earlier in the week, but there's always next year.

Good meeting you as well. Killer panel, keep up the great work and pushing this industry forward!

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18 hours ago, trevsdad said:

Took all week but finally ran down Alan Perlman and Lana Axelrod from UAV Coach and Drone Pilot Ground School at last week's ID in Las Vegas...great week! 

 

Wahoo! Great to meet you as well :)

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