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20 hours ago, Kara Murphy said:

The article is a good start but for fixed wing it is focused on the eBee. There are other, and more capable, fixed wings on the market that add the best of both worlds and for the money (though they are geared more towards larger businesses), blow quad and hex copters out of the water. One of the disadvantages of the eBee (and its Trimble cousin) that you failed to mention is how fragile it is. The foam-core construction and the lack of any means to support the airframe during landing are a drawback, in that you have to "crash" land the UAS each time you use it. The construction of these same airframes is less than hardy and frequently incurs damage requiring a steady replacement of structural parts. Even our Trimble rep suggested that we try an alternative instead of their model ($55,000.00 at last I checked).

The best example I can offer though not the only, is the FireFly6 Pro which can land and takeoff vertically like a quad and then assume a normal fixed-wing flight profile....the best of both worlds with a 200 acre per flight potential on one battery. It's cost compared against a comparable model of the eBee (eBee RTK) is less (and that costs includes its own RTK base station and a multi-spectral camera option). So don't rule out fixed-wing drones so fast. They are a viable and most cost efficient option for large-scale mapping than anything on the prosumer market.

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I've asked before if Kara works for DroneDeploy, I suspect that both here and the author of this article do.  There's nothing wrong if they do, but clearly this article is more about choosing the best drones based on information DroneDeploy has gathered from their experiences.

If this article were written from PrecisionHawks perspective I expect it would be totally different and would show that the majority of acreage scanned for mapping and agriculture is done with a fixed wing.  

 

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On 7/6/2017 at 9:43 AM, Av8Chuck said:

I've asked before if Kara works for DroneDeploy, I suspect that both here and the author of this article do.  There's nothing wrong if they do, but clearly this article is more about choosing the best drones based on information DroneDeploy has gathered from their experiences.

If this article were written from PrecisionHawks perspective I expect it would be totally different and would show that the majority of acreage scanned for mapping and agriculture is done with a fixed wing.  

 

Agreed.

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On July 5, 2017 at 1:30 PM, R Martin said:

The article is a good start but for fixed wing it is focused on the eBee. There are other, and more capable, fixed wings on the market that add the best of both worlds and for the money (though they are geared more towards larger businesses), blow quad and hex copters out of the water. One of the disadvantages of the eBee (and its Trimble cousin) that you failed to mention is how fragile it is. The foam-core construction and the lack of any means to support the airframe during landing are a drawback, in that you have to "crash" land the UAS each time you use it. The construction of these same airframes is less than hardy and frequently incurs damage requiring a steady replacement of structural parts. Even our Trimble rep suggested that we try an alternative instead of their model ($55,000.00 at last I checked).

The best example I can offer though not the only, is the FireFly6 Pro which can land and takeoff vertically like a quad and then assume a normal fixed-wing flight profile....the best of both worlds with a 200 acre per flight potential on one battery. It's cost compared against a comparable model of the eBee (eBee RTK) is less (and that costs includes its own RTK base station and a multi-spectral camera option). So don't rule out fixed-wing drones so fast. They are a viable and most cost efficient option for large-scale mapping than anything on the prosumer market.

This is really helpful and I'm going to pass it on to the author. I suspect he's writing from the perspective of what would be most useful with the particular software at hand but this is feedback that will help them develop in the long run. Thanks, R Martin.

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On 7/8/2017 at 5:16 AM, Kara Murphy said:

This is really helpful and I'm going to pass it on to the author. I suspect he's writing from the perspective of what would be most useful with the particular software at hand but this is feedback that will help them develop in the long run. Thanks, R Martin.

I confess that lately I have been really lazy and not done a lot of homework. We will be upgrading if I can get a new budget approved in FY19, and my hope is to add a new UAS that will have a significantly greater operating range than my Inspire (and I can squeeze the capital out of the board).

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi All,

New Here! My name is Alex and I work with a company called Pulse Aerospace. I often see the discussion of fixed wing vs. multi rotors? I am surprised that rotary wing aircraft are so often over looked. 

We come from a background of building flight controller (FCS) for larger rotary wing aircraft such as the Yamaha R-max. For the Past 7 years we have been producing different sized aircraft in many different markets. Everything from Military applications to Mom and Pop operators.

More recently we have been seeing more growth in aerial LiDAR and photogrammetry.  Since this is a mapping forum I will keep it at that. We can often combine the best of both worlds. We fly off of groundspeed not airspeed. This allows us to keep a consistent GSD as well as do away with worrying about crosswinds. Since the data is more consistent we can often do less than 60% lateral overlap and around 40% vertical. This gives 2-3 time the coverage area in a single flight 400-500 acres+. Of course they are VTOL. I don't think I need to say anything there. Our bigger platforms can carry 10lbs plus but the most common one for mapping can carry 5lbs for an hour. So any good mapping camera you like.  RTK, PPK and IMU options as well. 

Just some food for thought. AMA

 

Best,

Alex

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You guys have some great helicopters.  Most of the people using multirotors for mapping and agriculture started with DJI so many don't really know what it takes to get an accurate scan or carry five pounds for more than 15 minutes.

We have a gas helicopter and we're building a Y6 that can fly five pounds for 65 minutes.  

 

10_D6A3631.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Alan Perlman said:

You should be able to upload multiple, but the limit is 1MB. Not sure actually, if that's 1MB per image, or per post.

I think its 1MB per thread.  It would be great if that restriction was removed, raised or changed to "per post".

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32 minutes ago, Pulse Aerospace said:

Thanks!

@Av8Chuck Very cool! I would probably also take the candy! What applications/sensors are you looking at?

We are also building a gas helicopter! 

 

@Alan Perlman Happy to be here! Genuinely impressed with the level of knowledge on here!  The smaller bird is a mapping setup deliver the other day!

Small R 65 resize.jpg

Currently most of our projects are photogrammetry with the occasional aerial cinematography/photography thrown in.  We've also done a lot of Hyper-Spectral and HSI.  

The quality of required data continues to go up so for photogrammetry we're flying Sony A7RII and Canon 5Ds, both ~50MP camera's.  Plus all of the additional IMU's, better GPS, companion computers etc., require a larger, more powerful and efficient platform which bends the curve towards single rotor helicopters.  The challenge with SRH is not everyone can fly them.  I have 2000 hours of rotary wing time and I can't fly an RC helicopter well at all.

We're starting to experiment with LiDCAR and Flash LiDAR.  

Alan, I coach college football and when I take that van to practice you would not believe the crap I take.  

 

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Chuck,

 

I can fly manned AC but I cant fly RC helicopters very well. Luckily we have built a really nice FCS that controls the AC for you. Providing fully autonomous flight. LiDAR is probably one of our strongest markets given our payload capacity, autonomous FCS and reliability. 

A lot of the LiDAR we carry are 10lbs plus.  Feel free to shoot me an e mail if you are interested in more information. alex.hinkle@pulseaero.com

 

Best,

 

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Where you at AUVSI in Dallas?  

I stopped by your booth a couple of times.  I will email you, I am interested in your products.  We have manufactured our own multirotors for a variety of missions/projects that we've been a part of.  Don't really want to manufacture our own helicopters.  

If you were in Dallas you might be in this:

  

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