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By the end of the summer (2018), a whole crop of the first certified Part 107 pilots will be required to renew their certificates.  Some thoughts?  This is a huge number of remote pilots.  What's the attrition rate (i.e. who WON'T renew)?  How many sanctions?  How any new Part 107 pilots?  I liken the two-year re-certification process to a bi-annual Part 91 certificate (with, say, a part 333 ex.) but, I don't have any advice either, having gotten my Part 107 two years ago this fall.  Hope you'll comment ....

Thanks.

vb

 

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2 hours ago, victorbravo77 said:

By the end of the summer (2018), a whole crop of the first certified Part 107 pilots will be required to renew their certificates.  Some thoughts? 

I had a similar thought and posted this early last month.

 

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If past performance is any guide, the FAA will decide what is required 15-30 days before the deadline.   

My guess is they will require an online test is all unless they decide to actually require a demonstration of actual control standard.  But, since that would require having designated examiners in place I don't see that happening soon.

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@Dave Pitman, I agree that a control standard test is extremely unlikely.  However, as much as I would like to see an online recurrent test (at no cost), I do expect that we will have to go to a testing center to take it.  And of course, pay the $150.

 

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@Ed O'Grady My opinion is just a wild arse guess but how I came to it is by comparing what is required for flight reviews for part 61 fliers.  We are required to get with a flight instructor and fly for at least 1 hr to demonstrate actual ability.  And 1 hour of ground instruction to review mostly airspace and chart reading.

So,  if we eliminate review of ability we are left with airspace and chart review.  An online coarse can certainly fulfill this requirement.  We only pay the CFI for their time and nothing to the FAA.

Of course we'll have to wait and see.

Edited by Dave Pitman

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13 hours ago, Drone Driver said:

This my only FAA license, so I was thinking that I would have to re-take the exact same test again.

If this extract from the FAA part 107 documentation is anything to go by then a recurrent aeronautical test will be a subset of the original test covering just 7 of the 12 topics. In which case I think we will have to go back to a test center. Maybe it will be a shorter test, maybe not.

"Vaild for 2 years – certificate holders must pass a recurrent knowledge test every two years"

§107.73   Initial and recurrent knowledge tests.

(a) An initial aeronautical knowledge test covers the following areas of knowledge:

  • (1) Applicable regulations relating to small unmanned aircraft system rating privileges, limitations, and flight operation;
  • (2) Airspace classification, operating requirements, and flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation;
  • (3) Aviation weather sources and effects of weather on small unmanned aircraft performance;
  • (4) Small unmanned aircraft loading;
  • (5) Emergency procedures;
  • (6) Crew resource management;
  • (7) Radio communication procedures;
  • (8) Determining the performance of small unmanned aircraft;
  • (9) Physiological effects of drugs and alcohol;
  • (10) Aeronautical decision-making and judgment;
  • (11) Airport operations; and
  • (12) Maintenance and preflight inspection procedures.

(b) A recurrent aeronautical knowledge test covers the following areas of knowledge:

  • (1) Applicable regulations relating to small unmanned aircraft system rating privileges, limitations, and flight operation;
  • (2) Airspace classification and operating requirements and flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation;
  • (3) Emergency procedures;
  • (4) Crew resource management;
  • (5) Aeronautical decision-making and judgment;
  • (6) Airport operations; and
  • (7) Maintenance and preflight inspection procedures.
Edited by Spitfire76

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And if that turns out to be the case, it means making an appointment and paying $150 to the testing center again.  As I have said before, I expect many will not continue.

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Yah, this'll be interesting. I suspect a similar $150 recurrent test, but testing on fewer concepts. Curious if it'll be 60 questions, or a new SKU of 40 or 50.

This slide was from a presentation at the 2017 FAA UAS Symposium.

image.thumb.png.46904878ff2aabfda8383c432d5bafc3.png

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On 2/20/2018 at 12:35 PM, victorbravo77 said:

By the end of the summer (2018), a whole crop of the first certified Part 107 pilots will be required to renew their certificates.  Some thoughts?  This is a huge number of remote pilots.  What's the attrition rate (i.e. who WON'T renew)?  How many sanctions?  How any new Part 107 pilots?  I liken the two-year re-certification process to a bi-annual Part 91 certificate (with, say, a part 333 ex.) but, I don't have any advice either, having gotten my Part 107 two years ago this fall.  Hope you'll comment ....

Thanks.

vb

 

Is it true that you can apply for a part 107 waiver?

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2 hours ago, Danny Viviano said:

Is it true that you can apply for a part 107 waiver?

Not sure this is the right thread to be asking that question.

Short answer is yes, you can apply for a waiver.

More information below:

As an FAA-certified remote pilot under the Part 107 regulations, you may find yourself needing to apply for Airspace Authorization or a Waiver. They are two different things!

FAADroneZone

First, if you haven’t done so already, make sure to set up your account and Part 107 dashboard at FAADroneZone.

You’ll use that dashboard to register your sUAS models, to apply for and to track Airspace Authorization and Waiver applications, and (hopefully you won’t ever have to do this, but also) to report accidents.

According to FAADroneZone:

When applying for airspace authorization. “Use this to request access to controlled airspace. An airspace authorization is the mechanism by which an operator may seek Air Traffic Control (ATC) approval to operate in controlled airspace. Authorizations can be for a specific location or for broad areas governed by a single ATC jurisdiction.”

When applying for an airspace waiver. Use this to request a waiver from 14 C.F.R. 107.41. Airspace Waivers may be issued where the applicant can demonstrate safety mitigations through equipage, technology and or operational parameters that their UAS can safely operate in controlled airspace without seeking ATC authorization prior to each operation. Processing times for airspace waivers are significantly longer than processing times for airspace authorizations.

Let’s unpack that a little bit more.

Airspace Authorization

You’ll learn more about controlled airspace in the next module, but controlled airspace requires an extra level of sensitivity for all parties involved. There’s more traffic and a higher level of risk.

So even with your Part 107 certificate, if you need to operate in Class A, B, C, D, or E controlled airspace, you’ll need to get permission.

Want to learn more about airspace authorizations and how to apply for them?

We put together a step-by-step airspace authorization guide and update it regularly as the FAA continues to improve this process.

Waiver

The most common waiver application asks for permission to be exempt from the 107.29 Daylight operation rules so the operator can fly at night.

Other waiverable regulations include many of the rules of which you’re now familiar with:

  • 107.25 Operations from a moving vehicle or aircraft
  • 107.29 Daylight operation
  • 107.31 Visual line of sight aircraft operation
  • 107.33 Visual observer
  • 107.35 Operation of multiple small unmanned aircraft (At the moment, under the standard provisions of Part 107, a remote PIC is not allowed to simultaneously operate more than one small UA at a time. Even with the use of fancy automation, the operation of multiple small UA is not permitted without a waiver.)
  • 107.37(a) Operation near aircraft
  • 107.39 Operation over people
  • 107.51(a) Operating limitations: ground speed
  • 107.51(b) Operating limitations: altitude
  • 107.51(c) Operating limitations: minimum visibility
  • 107.51(d) Operating limitations: minimum distance from clouds

The application must contain a complete description of the proposed operation and a justification, including supporting data and documentation (as necessary) that establishes that the proposed operation can safely be conducted under the terms of a CoW.

CoW stands for ‘Certificate of Waiver.’

The FAA will only approve your Waiver application when it has been determined that the proposed operation can be safely conducted under the terms of that waiver.

So make sure to read the instructions and the performance-based standards and to be thoughtful in your application!

The FAA says it will strive to complete review and adjudication of Waivers within 90 days; however, the time required for the FAA to make a determination regarding waiver requests will vary based on the complexity of the request and the FAA resources available. The amount of data and analysis required as part of the application will be proportional to the specific relief that is requested.

If a Waiver is granted, that certificate may include specific special provisions designed to ensure that the sUAS operation may be conducted as safely as one conducted under the provisions of Part 107.

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1 hour ago, Patti Parker Ruffos said:

I've actually heard rumor they may be considering extending the recertification requirement out to 5 years?

The keyword here is rumor :)

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5 year recertification would be delightful, but I am expecting having to go into the testing center again.

I've read a bunch of articles lately on how many people are working and not licensed because there is no punishment for being recreational and making money off your drone business.  As such, I am curious how many people will not renew in the fall and just continue to operate their business/fly.

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On 2/21/2018 at 9:39 AM, Spitfire76 said:

If this extract from the FAA part 107 documentation is anything to go by then a recurrent aeronautical test will be a subset of the original test covering just 7 of the 12 topics. In which case I think we will have to go back to a test center. Maybe it will be a shorter test, maybe not.

"Vaild for 2 years – certificate holders must pass a recurrent knowledge test every two years"

§107.73   Initial and recurrent knowledge tests.

(a) An initial aeronautical knowledge test covers the following areas of knowledge:

  • (1) Applicable regulations relating to small unmanned aircraft system rating privileges, limitations, and flight operation;
  • (2) Airspace classification, operating requirements, and flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation;
  • (3) Aviation weather sources and effects of weather on small unmanned aircraft performance;
  • (4) Small unmanned aircraft loading;
  • (5) Emergency procedures;
  • (6) Crew resource management;
  • (7) Radio communication procedures;
  • (8) Determining the performance of small unmanned aircraft;
  • (9) Physiological effects of drugs and alcohol;
  • (10) Aeronautical decision-making and judgment;
  • (11) Airport operations; and
  • (12) Maintenance and preflight inspection procedures.

(b) A recurrent aeronautical knowledge test covers the following areas of knowledge:

  • (1) Applicable regulations relating to small unmanned aircraft system rating privileges, limitations, and flight operation;
  • (2) Airspace classification and operating requirements and flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation;
  • (3) Emergency procedures;
  • (4) Crew resource management;
  • (5) Aeronautical decision-making and judgment;
  • (6) Airport operations; and
  • (7) Maintenance and preflight inspection procedures.

I could've been a little more precise in my Q.  The advisory circular (A/C 107-2 AFS-1) offers a little additional insight.  I understand recurrent testing can be done online.  Thank you for the Part 107 itemization.

I wondered if there are sample tests/study materials (sort of redundant since all the Part 107 testing info is available) around.

vb

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23 hours ago, Danny Viviano said:

Is it true that you can apply for a part 107 waiver?

Not from Part 107 itself.  Alan is correct above (below?).  "Waiver" applies to certain restrictions inherent in the Part 107 regs themselves like flying 30 minutes before/after sunrise/sunset, over people, beyond LOS, etc. for commercial operations.  You can't request a waiver from Part 107 in its entirety to fly commercially.  Remember, Part 107 applies to commercial sUAS flight.

Edited by victorbravo77
wording

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11 minutes ago, victorbravo77 said:

I could've been a little more precise in my Q.  The advisory circular (A/C 107-2 AFS-1) offers a little additional insight.  I understand recurrent testing can be done online.

I think you might be referring to section 6.6.2 of that advisory circular but if you read it carefully the online training only applies to part 61 pilots. 

A part 61 pilot certificate holder who has completed a flight review within the previous 24 calendar-months may complete a recurrent online training course instead of taking the knowledge test.

At least that's the way I understood it.

Edited by Spitfire76

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Clear as mud, as the Army often says.  But, then that's why I ask the Q.  Of course I meant Part 61 rather than 91, but both are applicable by incorporation.  Thank you Spitfire76!  BTW is that a Rolls Royce, or Packard Merlin?? LOL!

And, do you think a practical component of the test is appropriate (e.g. fly a 'T' or fly a box or fly a circle - turns about a point?  S-turns along a road?  Sudden loss of line of sight)?  Good stuff, this.

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52 minutes ago, victorbravo77 said:

BTW is that a Rolls Royce, or Packard Merlin??

Good question!. The one that I have has an Emax 2215 1180kv :)

IMG_0839.thumb.jpg.8e43bff96c239236d98645e88407e4d5.jpg

The other one that I had had a 1500cc Triumph motor!.IMG_0536.thumb.jpg.499637689c51c4b513de9b940f03d62d.jpg

 

 

Edited by Spitfire76

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On 2/20/2018 at 9:19 PM, Dave Pitman said:

@Ed O'Grady My opinion is just a wild arse guess but how I came to it is by comparing what is required for flight reviews for part 61 fliers.  We are required to get with a flight instructor and fly for at least 1 hr to demonstrate actual ability.  And 1 hour of ground instruction to review mostly airspace and chart reading.

So,  if we eliminate review of ability we are left with airspace and chart review.  An online coarse can certainly fulfill this requirement.  We only pay the CFI for their time and nothing to the FAA.

Of course we'll have to wait and see.

Going to have to take 107 test again, read the fine print

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The test I took as a part 61 was a simple online, no cost test. Can you point me to an actual policy statement? Or are you just guessing like the rest of us?

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