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This type of thread comes up way too often.  People dissecting shots from a drone that they generally don’t have any first hand knowledge how it was done questioning the safety and legality of the operator.  

How about you go out shoot your own work, post the results here for others to see as an example of how it should be done.  How about using drones in ways that inspire others to do the same.  

Theres a saying “Those that can, do.  Those that can’t, teach.  Those that can do niether do social media!”  

So should the pictures in that article make you cringe?  No.  

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  Actually, I do shoot my own work. I Just recently wrapped up a commercial real estate shoot for a company a couple days ago. However, under Tennessee law, I can not share the photos. The location was right beside a state highway and they wanted eight shots, one for each compass point. I had to adjust two of my shots to make sure I wasn't sitting over the highway while lining up my shots. Another example, I was contracted to do an insurance shoot at a bank. They wanted it done as soon as possible, but I was able to negotiate with them to wait until a Sunday when the bank is closed and there aren't any soft targets wandering around.

  When I do a shoot, I always ask myself, "could I get flagged for this shot? If anything goes wrong, will someone get hurt? Will this ruin or strengthen the image of fellow pilots?". Most of the time, people don't see us flying around. They see our work. "A picture is worth a thousand words", and that holds true when we fly. Is the pilot careful, professional, and upholds 14 CFR part 107? Seeing photos directly over a busy highway with construction, and with an interstate over it is neither of them. As remote pilots in command, we are not only responsible for what we do, but for everyone that is under our UAS as we work. We are lucky not to have any UAS related fatalities yet. Doesn't mean we should tempt fate just to get a good shot. 

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3 hours ago, SkyFox said:

When I do a shoot, I always ask myself, "could I get flagged for this shot? If anything goes wrong, will someone get hurt? Will this ruin or strengthen the image of fellow pilots?". 

Good guidelines.  You will find plenty of very good videos where the operator is clearly not following them.  In today's environment, they can get away with it until the time something goes wrong. The FAA has regulations but they do not currently enforce them.  So, at this point, we are all left with our own guidelines and risk analysis to go by.

UAV Coach itself has highlighted work that is breaking rules.  Each of us have to make our own decisions without worrying about those that don't care.

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My point is that if you have a good work ethic and follow the rules then show examples of how you accomplished it legally and lead by example.  Unless you were there or have first-hand knowledge how can you possibly know what altitude those were shot at and if they were directly over traffic?

Its very easy to move a drone ten feet from the road, take a shot from 200 feet and then adjust the lens distortion in Lightroom and make the camera appear to be over the centerline.  Google forced perspective.  I have no idea that they did that and you have no idea that they didn't.  What's a safe distance from the road, five feet?  Ten feet? 100 feet?  what's the rule?

Also: 

6 hours ago, SkyFox said:

We are lucky not to have any UAS related fatalities yet. Doesn't mean we should tempt fate just to get a good shot. 

Why do you think its luck?  Rules don't make you safe, they're a nomenclature, a starting point so that everyone involved knows what to expect.  A safe operator is someone who takes the rules into account to mitigate risk, its not someone who religiously follows them.  Especially rules developed by people who likely have never seen a drone let alone operated one in a commercial application.  

I'm not calling the rules themselves into question, but I think the safety record of the commercial UAV industry over the past 10 years has nothing to do with luck and more to do with the fact that the overwhelming number of commercial operators take the responsibility for safety way more seriously than the people who created the rules.  

So what kind of drone do you fly commercially?  Is it quad?  If so, how safe are you?  There's absolutely no hardware redundancy on a quad.  If a motor, prop, or ESC fails the drone crashes and there's absolutely nothing you can do about it.  Right?  

So forget the rules for a moment, where's the indignation regarding the safety of the hardware and software?   

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