leyrerwa

Do School Teachers Need To Be Pt. 107 Certified?

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Greetings Gang,

I believe that at some point I may have asked this question but, with daily changes and adaptations to the "rules" I'd like to throw this out here again.

OK, if a school teacher is teaching Drone Flight/Technology to his/her students as part of a technology curriculum and since during that portion of the class period of instruction the teacher is of course being "paid" under their standard contract, is that conducive to "compensation" while flying and thus requires the teacher to be Part 107 Certified?

Again, the flight training and actual flights are taking place during school hours.

Any clarification provided on this 'situation' would be greatly appreciated.

WAL 

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If the barrier to get a 107 was high, I could see the point of your question/concern.   But the barrier to getting your 107 is very low so I would recommend getting it whether it’s tequired or not.  

I would think your school district would have more of a say in this issue than the FAA and would require it.  Your teaching young people to use something that has the potential to hurt them, generally not likely or hopefully seriously, but if something like that we’re to happen and you don’t have a 107 I think it would be bad for you and your program.  

Why take the risk?  

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I'd like to know the answer to this too. I've been out of drones for awhile and as a teacher, I am now back supervising high school students to fly drones. Last time I checked, teachers were not allowed to fly, except to recover control of the drone. Students were allowed to fly under hobby rules. Teachers could fly outside of class as hobbyists too. 

I plan to get the 107, but would like to know if I am in compliance under the old rules or have they changed? 

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Under the old rules, if there's compensation involved then its a commercial activity.  So if students pay to go to school and this is included in the curriculum then its commercial, even if its a State funded school.

There was considerable confusion prior to Part 107 where organizations could get a 333 exemption for education.  However, all of that expired with the 333's. 

I'm only partially joking here when I say instead of thinking of whether its legal under the old rules or trying to circumnavigate the 107 rules, think of the UAV as a gun.  As a teacher you know that you have to take all the precautions necessary to not only protect other peoples children but also yourself and school district.  Would you teach young people to shoot a gun or drive a car without ALL the certificates and insurance required to do this professionally?

If kids want to learn how to fly a drone as a hobbyist then send them along to an AMA field to have some fun, but if you want to use UAVs as part of a STEM curriculum then you should get your 107 and check with your school district on their policies regarding flying UAVs on school property etc..

You should also have a Incident Specific Safety Plan (ISSP) that all of the students sign and understand who to call in case of an emergency, where the closest hospital is and how to get there, the location of the place your flying so they can provide that information to first responders etc..  

If you don't do that and a student gets injured by a UAV an attorney is going to have a field day with you, and it won't be fun.     

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Greetings,

Thank you all for your responses and shared (valid) concerns.

Alan, I found the info-graphic extremely helpful and I plan to share it with other teachers who are looking to incorporate and/or enhance their current curriculum based drone activities, especially at the middle school STEM level where the students can be a bit less 'control-oriented'.

Looks like it's time to resume/re-open my Drone Pilot Ground School Lessons!!!

Clear Skies,

BIll L.

Duncan, OK 

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In general, its probably best to have the UAS Certificate.  Following the letter of the law... if you're paid to teach and you're teaching students and flying (other than safe recovery) you'll need the 107.

I'm in a particularly bad position.... my school is within the zero altitude area of the local class D and the tower at the airport is a contract tower and not part of the LAANC system.   I know the tower chief and have had him over to the school when we had a 333 exemption but now his hands are tied.  I've had a COA request in the system for over a year and have not heard anything from the FAA. 

Also for me its a matter of not just losing my UAS Certificate but also my other flying privileges.... the FAA very seldom takes just one certificate.

Oh yea... the chart is awesome Alan!!

 

 

Edited by B Ervin
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Don't forget that flying indoors is not regulated by FAA.  So an empty gym, aircraft hangar, or wharehouse might be an option.

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On 10/6/2018 at 12:58 PM, Ed O'Grady said:

Don't forget that flying indoors is not regulated by FAA.  So an empty gym, aircraft hangar, or wharehouse might be an option.

Yes, great point Ed.

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Great infographic! I've been pining for something like that for a while now. My school is a public school and all flying is being done as part of other curriculum.

The infographic really cuts through muck to make it easily understandable. I'm getting started on Part 107 now. I've also been scared in to doing some documentation, which has been pretty thin up until this point. 

-Fun side note about the gun analogy. I live in Helena, Montana and our middle schools actually had gun ranges in the basements. Students were taught how to properly handle and fire a rifle. I think they were pellet rifles shooting lead slugs.  Anyway, they shut them down some time in the 80's because of the lead being deposited in the backstops was a health hazard. Times have changed. 

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Greetings Gang,

Indeed Ed, we do have access to a moderately sized area for indoor flying that I use primarily for the intro and beginning flights when it's available.

However, you may have noticed that I live in Oklahoma where the wind typically does come "sweeping down the plains!!"

Basically, that means eventually, if there are any future aspirations of my students flying outdoors (for recreation or business) they must become very comfortable flying in breezy to moderately windy conditions. Nothing beyond acceptable limits of course.

Any Aero-based endeavors - i.e. drones, r/c airplanes, rocketry, etc. - is always a challenge here. Not every day but, more than most.

Clear Skies,

Bill L.

 

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We're not your average school, Career Technology based programs with core ed. support.  Our sports are tech competitions like SkillsUSA, TSA, Etc 

No Gym, no real inside place to fly other than a classroom.  I'm working on an netted enclosure in the back parking lot, but its all about the money.

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Greetings,

I too am a career tech teacher at a technology center in Oklahoma. I teach Electronics and Aviation Fundamentals.

Hence, my original post.

No Gym's at tech centers, unfortunately. I typically use an open loading dock area with a relatively high ceiling to get the students started.

I don't know where your located but, last year we demoed a new drone competition for Oklahoma Skills USA. We're hoping it catches on and becomes a regular competition.

Clear Skies,

Bill L.

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Heck Bill, your just up the road a bit by Texas standards,  I'm in Grand Prairie in the Dallas Metroplex

 

I think Skills will pick it up nationally eventually, we're trying to push aviation more down here in Texas, maintenance is all they have now.   I'm pushing hard for the pilot side of the house, I've got Redbird Flight Simulations committed to doing scenarios and providing simulators and AOPA has agreed to help as well and has invited Skills national to their High School Aviation Symposium next month in Louisville KY.   You going to the Symposium?

You have info on how you laid out your competition?

Edited by B Ervin

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