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Aloha peeps!  

We often talk about including interior and ground level photography with our exterior drone work, as a way to round out our real estate media biz models.  Today, I thought I'd share a few examples of what I produce for my clients.  

This home is going to be listed for somewhere around the $3M mark, and for good reason.  The area where it's located is sparsely populated, and by sparsely, I mean like barely anyone or anything around, other than cows, goats & sheep.  There's a small winery, general store, and post office nearby and that's it.  Privacy on an island is quite valuable, as anyone could imagine.

Shooting interiors to showcase a view is all about realism.  Whether you use lighting or HDR techniques, the main thing is to make it feel as real as you can, so the viewer gets the sense of actually being there.  Personally, I prefer to use lighting, but occasionally there just aren't enough lights in the world, so an HDR shot is in order. Even then, I'll incorporate lighting to help with the realism part.

The interior shots in this post were done using a combination of radio triggered speed lights, sometimes with a shoot-thru umbrella.  I used a Sony A7R III + 16-35mm G Master glass.  Each frame is a single exposure, worked in Lightroom, no HDR work here.  

Mahalo for viewing, and enjoy!

 

A7304307-600x400.jpgA7304335-600x400.jpgA7304337-600x400.jpgA7304348-600x400.jpgA7304347-600x400.jpgA7304511-600x400.jpgA7304522-600x400.jpgDJI_0106-600x450.jpgDJI_0115-600x450.jpgDJI_0097-600x400.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, JBR LIFE Photography said:

Aloha peeps!  

We often talk about including interior and ground level photography with our exterior drone work, as a way to round out our real estate media biz models.  Today, I thought I'd share a few examples of what I produce for my clients.  

This home is going to be listed for somewhere around the $3M mark, and for good reason.  The area where it's located is sparsely populated, and by sparsely, I mean like barely anyone or anything around, other than cows, goats & sheep.  There's a small winery, general store, and post office nearby and that's it.  Privacy on an island is quite valuable, as anyone could imagine.

Shooting interiors to showcase a view is all about realism.  Whether you use lighting or HDR techniques, the main thing is to make it feel as real as you can, so the viewer gets the sense of actually being there.  Personally, I prefer to use lighting, but occasionally there just aren't enough lights in the world, so an HDR shot is in order. Even then, I'll incorporate lighting to help with the realism part.

The interior shots in this post were done using a combination of radio triggered speed lights, sometimes with a shoot-thru umbrella.  I used a Sony A7R III + 16-35mm G Master glass.  Each frame is a single exposure, worked in Lightroom, no HDR work here.  

Mahalo for viewing, and enjoy!

 

A7304307-600x400.jpgA7304335-600x400.jpgA7304337-600x400.jpgA7304348-600x400.jpgA7304347-600x400.jpgA7304511-600x400.jpgA7304522-600x400.jpgDJI_0106-600x450.jpgDJI_0115-600x450.jpgDJI_0097-600x400.jpg

 

The first two aerial shots, Did you use the lume cubes for those ? I can see the new lighting kits at work in these photos. Really does make a difference. Beautiful.

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3 hours ago, Luke said:

The first two aerial shots, Did you use the lume cubes for those ? I can see the new lighting kits at work in these photos. Really does make a difference. Beautiful.

No lights on the drone shots, just exposed for the highlights and brought out the darker details in post.

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3 hours ago, JBR LIFE Photography said:

No lights on the drone shots, just exposed for the highlights and brought out the darker details in post.

You did a very good job making these photos really POP. Is the last one a pano ?

I'd love to live there....too bad I don't have 3 million dollars. You should have Chuck buy it and I can take care of the place while hes gone. A place like that probably needs up keep.?

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15 minutes ago, Luke said:

You did a very good job making these photos really POP. Is the last one a pano ?

Mahalo Luke!  The last is a single frame.  I rarely do pano work for projects, unless I know they're going to print it large, like giant sign or even billboard (so glad we don't have billboards here...not allowed, and no need anyway...small island).

Regarding making the images pop, I'll share with you some knowledge that was passed to me by a dear friend, who recently retired from Apple as Senior Photographer.  Of course I'm paraphrasing, but I'll give it my best reiteration.

From the moment you conceptualize a photo in your mind's eye, that photo begins a journey.  Its journey will last through all of the steps involved -capturing the image with a camera, processing it afterward, being presented for final viewing, whether online or in print.  You should have every step of that journey in your mind before you ever press the shutter button.

The point is, shoot for your edits, so you can properly edit for your shoot.  If you haven't already, find out where your cameras max out on dynamic range from light to dark, and then you know how to find the best balance of camera settings to suit your editing, producing the image you desire.  

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4 minutes ago, JBR LIFE Photography said:

Regarding making the images pop, I'll share with you some knowledge that was passed to me by a dear friend, who recently retired from Apple as Senior Photographer.  Of course I'm paraphrasing, but I'll give it my best reiteration.

From the moment you conceptualize a photo in your mind's eye, that photo begins a journey.  Its journey will last through all of the steps involved -capturing the image with a camera, processing it afterward, being presented for final viewing, whether online or in print.  You should have every step of that journey in your mind before you ever press the shutter button.

The point is, shoot for your edits, so you can properly edit for your shoot.  If you haven't already, find out where your cameras max out on dynamic range from light to dark, and then you know how to find the best balance of camera settings to suit your editing, producing the image you desire.  

I remember you telling me that awhile ago in my Camera Settings thread I made. I've thought a lot about that. I still think about it even when I'm in our shop welding. (until I realize I'm screwing up the project I'm working on. hehe) Thank for the advice. I really appreciate it.

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Looks like an amazing property. Like you, I also offer interiors. Really helps land the jobs!  Great work.

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Nice work as always JBR.  I'm spending the winter polishing my interior skills so I can be a one stop shop for all the realtors next spring.  I just picked up an XPLOR 600 to do the flashed shots and am working the photoshop blending techniques.  

It seems like the local realtors just want single vendor, so I'm hoping by offering everything business will pick up even more.

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