Approval From LAANC to fly in Class E Airspace?


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I live within five miles of a non towered airfield that used to require field operator consent via phone. Currently using Airmap or B4UFly apps, it states either  laanc is not available or authorization not required. 

Question is do I still have get phone permission from field operator?  I am a recreational flyer.

Thank you.

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Short answer is yes, I am relatively certain that you must still contact the airport manager prior to flying within 5 miles of the airport.  Though they're somewhat ambiguous, the FAA still has the "you must call" terminology in places on their website and they reference flying by "community standards".  Always better to be safe than sorry so I say when in doubt, call.  The airport manager may tell you there is no need but then you'll know for sure.

Keep in mind that some Class E airspace starts at 700 or 1200 AGL.  Areas like this is where Class G underlies the Class E.  Hence you can fly but must call.  However, your non towered airport may be Class E2.  Does it have instrument approach?  Class E2 starts at the surface and requires authorization through AirMap, DroneZone, etc.  The UAS Facilities Map and VFR Map along with chart supplements will help you ID the subclass of  Class E airspace.  If you don't see the LAANC overlay covering any given controlled airspace airport on the facilities map, then you must request authorization via DroneZone.

Also note that when using AirMap, you get an additional set of overlays with more details if you highlight the optional "AirMap Recommended Guidelines" option.

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On 8/3/2019 at 10:58 AM, Dave Shipper said:

Short answer is yes, I am relatively certain that you must still contact the airport manager prior to flying within 5 miles of the airport.  Though they're somewhat ambiguous, the FAA still has the "you must call" terminology in places on their website and they reference flying by "community standards".  Always better to be safe than sorry so I say when in doubt, call.  The airport manager may tell you there is no need but then you'll know for sure.

Keep in mind that some Class E airspace starts at 700 or 1200 AGL.  Areas like this is where Class G underlies the Class E.  Hence you can fly but must call.  However, your non towered airport may be Class E2.  Does it have instrument approach?  Class E2 starts at the surface and requires authorization through AirMap, DroneZone, etc.  The UAS Facilities Map and VFR Map along with chart supplements will help you ID the subclass of  Class E airspace.  If you don't see the LAANC overlay covering any given controlled airspace airport on the facilities map, then you must request authorization via DroneZone.

Also note that when using AirMap, you get an additional set of overlays with more details if you highlight the optional "AirMap Recommended Guidelines" option.

Thanks you for the input. Im not familiar with Dropzone. Is it an app similar to B4UFly and Airmap? 

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On 8/3/2019 at 10:58 AM, Dave Shipper said:

Short answer is yes, I am relatively certain that you must still contact the airport manager prior to flying within 5 miles of the airport.  Though they're somewhat ambiguous, the FAA still has the "you must call" terminology in places on their website and they reference flying by "community standards".  Always better to be safe than sorry so I say when in doubt, call.  The airport manager may tell you there is no need but then you'll know for sure.

Keep in mind that some Class E airspace starts at 700 or 1200 AGL.  Areas like this is where Class G underlies the Class E.  Hence you can fly but must call.  However, your non towered airport may be Class E2.  Does it have instrument approach?  Class E2 starts at the surface and requires authorization through AirMap, DroneZone, etc.  The UAS Facilities Map and VFR Map along with chart supplements will help you ID the subclass of  Class E airspace.  If you don't see the LAANC overlay covering any given controlled airspace airport on the facilities map, then you must request authorization via DroneZone.

Also note that when using AirMap, you get an additional set of overlays with more details if you highlight the optional "AirMap Recommended Guidelines" option.

I don't think this is valid any longer. The dissolution of 336 changed the way recreational flight is handled. The Cliff notes can be found here: https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_fliers/

 

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3 hours ago, R Martin said:

I don't think this is valid any longer. The dissolution of 336 changed the way recreational flight is handled. The Cliff notes can be found here: https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_fliers/

 

But the thing is, the referenced "community standards" still speak of calling airport operations prior to flying.  If it was strictly left up to me & my interpretations of the rules for recreational flyers, I'd say it seems to clearly state don't fly around airports at all.

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