How do you care drone battery?


Doner815
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Most of us are using LiPo packs to charge our drone, but we are all aware of the potential risks in them that may cost your entire drone if not properly cared or used. In this case, we will resort to some smart battery that has battery management system built in. Some may abide by strict rules to care battery. So what are the basic rules in drone battery care and some tricks that not everyone knows that can extend battery life? Would appreciate some sharig here.

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Hi @Doner815

Here is an excerpt from one of our articles on the topic. You can read the full article here

Pay attention to the temperature.

LiPo batteries don’t work well in cold weather.

The colder it is, the shorter your battery life will be due to the slowing down of the chemical activity within the battery. You’ll start to see decreased performance at 59°F (15°C) or colder.

If it’s below 14°F (-10°C), LiPo usage is not recommended at all (i.e., no flying!), since your battery could cause your drone to suddenly fail without warning in these temperatures.

In talking to our CEO Alan Perlman, he told me that he took off in 20° weather with a fully charged battery, and after just 2-3 minutes his battery had dropped to 79%. He flew for about 10 minutes in total and landed just fine with battery to spare, but it was interesting to see that immediate drop after take off.

Battery storage is crucial.

Temperature matters. Always store your LiPo batteries in a cool, dry place. Shoot for room temperature. Do not store them in a hot garage or in a refrigerator. Even though a cold battery has less chemical reactions taking place, and this can prolong its lifespan, taking a battery out from a cold fridge can cause condensation to occur on the inside of the battery, which can be very dangerous. And while cold can be damaging, so can heat. The hotter your batteries get, the shorter their lifespan will be. Never charge a battery that is still warm from usage, and never use a battery that is still warm from charging.

Here are a few more tips for storage:

  • Make sure to disconnect the batteries when you’re not using them, and store them in a fireproof container.
  • Don’t story batteries in extreme cold or heat, including sunlight. The ideal temperature range for storage is 14°F  to 113°F.
  • If storing for a long period of time without any use (i.e., several months or more), ideal temperature range is 73°F to 82°F.
  • Don’t store loose batteries together. This could lead to the terminals touching, which might cause a short circuit.

Bottom line, be thoughtful not just about what you do right before you fly (which we’ll get into below) but also about how you care for and maintain your batteries between flights.

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On 8/23/2019 at 4:41 AM, Doner815 said:

Most of us are using LiPo packs to charge our drone, but we are all aware of the potential risks in them that may cost your entire drone if not properly cared or used. In this case, we will resort to some smart battery that has battery management system built in. Some may abide by strict rules to care battery. So what are the basic rules in drone battery care and some tricks that not everyone knows that can extend battery life? Would appreciate some sharig here.

Perhaps one of the best YouTube videos I've seen about battery care for a drone suggested treating your batteries as if it were a puppy.  

You wouldn't leave a puppy in a hot car or in a freezing car over night.  Likewise you drone battery.

You wouldn't feed a puppy a huge meal then put it in a crate for an extended period of time.  Likewise don't store a battery fully charged.

You wouldn't exercise a puppy really hard and then wrap it in a blanket and put it in a crate.  Don't run your batteries hard and then not give it time to cool down before storing it.

You wouldn't run a puppy unit it drops from exhaustion.  Don't fully discharge a battery.

You wouldn't want to drop a puppy, it's still a delicate creature and easily injured.  Be careful when handling your batteries and don't drop them.

 Whatever you are doing with your battery, ask yourself, if this was a puppy, would I treat it like this?  If the answer is no, then don't do it to your battery.

As for me, I have a litter of 13 batteries, the first 5 didn't do so well because I didn't take care of them well.  An expensive lesson for a Phantom 4 Pro battery.  The other 8 are treated like puppies and they go out to play frequently and are all very healthy.  Hopefully they will live a long life with proper care.

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On 8/25/2019 at 6:54 AM, Drone Flyer said:

Perhaps one of the best YouTube videos I've seen about battery care for a drone suggested treating your batteries as if it were a puppy.  

You wouldn't leave a puppy in a hot car or in a freezing car over night.  Likewise you drone battery.

You wouldn't feed a puppy a huge meal then put it in a crate for an extended period of time.  Likewise don't store a battery fully charged.

You wouldn't exercise a puppy really hard and then wrap it in a blanket and put it in a crate.  Don't run your batteries hard and then not give it time to cool down before storing it.

You wouldn't run a puppy unit it drops from exhaustion.  Don't fully discharge a battery.

You wouldn't want to drop a puppy, it's still a delicate creature and easily injured.  Be careful when handling your batteries and don't drop them.

 Whatever you are doing with your battery, ask yourself, if this was a puppy, would I treat it like this?  If the answer is no, then don't do it to your battery.

As for me, I have a litter of 13 batteries, the first 5 didn't do so well because I didn't take care of them well.  An expensive lesson for a Phantom 4 Pro battery.  The other 8 are treated like puppies and they go out to play frequently and are all very healthy.  Hopefully they will live a long life with proper care.

 

Thank you , this really makes it easier to understand how to care for battery.

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On 8/24/2019 at 12:05 AM, Isabella | UAV Coach said:

Hi @Doner815

Here is an excerpt from one of our articles on the topic. You can read the full article here

Pay attention to the temperature.

LiPo batteries don’t work well in cold weather.

The colder it is, the shorter your battery life will be due to the slowing down of the chemical activity within the battery. You’ll start to see decreased performance at 59°F (15°C) or colder.

If it’s below 14°F (-10°C), LiPo usage is not recommended at all (i.e., no flying!), since your battery could cause your drone to suddenly fail without warning in these temperatures.

In talking to our CEO Alan Perlman, he told me that he took off in 20° weather with a fully charged battery, and after just 2-3 minutes his battery had dropped to 79%. He flew for about 10 minutes in total and landed just fine with battery to spare, but it was interesting to see that immediate drop after take off.

Battery storage is crucial.

Temperature matters. Always store your LiPo batteries in a cool, dry place. Shoot for room temperature. Do not store them in a hot garage or in a refrigerator. Even though a cold battery has less chemical reactions taking place, and this can prolong its lifespan, taking a battery out from a cold fridge can cause condensation to occur on the inside of the battery, which can be very dangerous. And while cold can be damaging, so can heat. The hotter your batteries get, the shorter their lifespan will be. Never charge a battery that is still warm from usage, and never use a battery that is still warm from charging.

Here are a few more tips for storage:

  • Make sure to disconnect the batteries when you’re not using them, and store them in a fireproof container.
  • Don’t story batteries in extreme cold or heat, including sunlight. The ideal temperature range for storage is 14°F  to 113°F.
  • If storing for a long period of time without any use (i.e., several months or more), ideal temperature range is 73°F to 82°F.
  • Don’t store loose batteries together. This could lead to the terminals touching, which might cause a short circuit.

Bottom line, be thoughtful not just about what you do right before you fly (which we’ll get into below) but also about how you care for and maintain your batteries between flights.

Thanks a lot for your detailed explanation

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