Isabella | UAV Coach

Voluntary Remote ID Participation

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Commercial and hobbyist drone pilots may find themselves equipping their drones with remote identification technology before the year is up. The Drone Advisory Committee (DAC) has proposed that a voluntary program be implemented until the FAA establishes a Final Rule for remote identification. This program would ask manufacturers or operators to equip their drones with remote identification technology in exchange for certain privileges. 

At their most recent quarterly meeting, the DAC suggested providing incentives to operators who voluntarily use UAS equipped with Remote ID. These included incentives such as expedited waiver requests, waived drone registration fees, and improved airspace access. Learn more about the suggested incentives in today's post: Drone Pilots Who Voluntarily Equip their Drones with Remote ID Could Receive Major Benefits

Should the FAA decide to implement these incentives, we imagine a majority of commercial drone operators would be willing to comply in order to expand their operational capabilities. Comment below on if you would voluntarily equip your drone with Remote ID in exchange for any of the DAC’s proposed incentives. 

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I would equip my drone with remote identification technology.  It would help secure jobs faster and make sure I do stay compliant which I always try to be.  I don't want to be the cause of any more restrictions.  There are enough out there giving us a bad name.

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I would absolutely do it. The perks would beneficial, but I also believe it could also provide for a safer environment in areas like mine where there is frequent civilian and military traffic in open airspace. 

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I'm not convinced that pursuing another technology in the form of the ATSM remote ID standard is the way to go. ADS-B already meets the criteria and such a capability will allow drones to fully integrate into the national airspace system if/when necessary.

The article makes reference to using Bluetooth and Wi-Fi signals, but I cannot see how these would have the range and coverage inherent in ADS-B technology.

There's been a lot of discussion about how adding drones into the system would "overwhelm" the ADS-B spectrum, but this has been rebutted both technically and in terms of air traffic control operations. 

 I've been particularly interested in equipping my drone with ADS-B out capability and the technology is now there. For example the Ping 1090i from uAvionix is an ADS-B Transceiver, with Integrated GPS and a barometer. It weighs 25 grams and only draws about 500mW power. Even with an antenna and separate battery, it should be well within the payload capacity of my Phantom 4, for example.

But, at $2,000, the cost is still too much to justify for a Part 107 advanced drone hobbyist like myself, who occasionally does low-level commercial flights for not a lot of money.

However, by backing the ADS-B standard, rather than introducing another technology, the price of miniaturized systems needed for drones would be driven down through economies of scale.

Edited by pb3
mistake
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I would register my drones asap. We have needed this for some time now. I'm not afraid of "Big Brother" trying to figure out where I am or what I am doing, he already knows. I have nothing to hide. We aren't children anymore, we are adults, and need to act like adults.

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Absolutely would! It's a give and take benefit for professionals. I believe it would add professionalism and legitamacy to the industry who would with the laws and separate those reluctant to do so and obtain licensing for commercial use.

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On 10/23/2019 at 3:11 PM, Isabella | UAV Coach said:

Commercial and hobbyist drone pilots may find themselves equipping their drones with remote identification technology before the year is up. The Drone Advisory Committee (DAC) has proposed that a voluntary program be implemented until the FAA establishes a Final Rule for remote identification. This program would ask manufacturers or operators to equip their drones with remote identification technology in exchange for certain privileges. 

At their most recent quarterly meeting, the DAC suggested providing incentives to operators who voluntarily use UAS equipped with Remote ID. These included incentives such as expedited waiver requests, waived drone registration fees, and improved airspace access. Learn more about the suggested incentives in today's post: Drone Pilots Who Voluntarily Equip their Drones with Remote ID Could Receive Major Benefits

Should the FAA decide to implement these incentives, we imagine a majority of commercial drone operators would be willing to comply in order to expand their operational capabilities. Comment below on if you would voluntarily equip your drone with Remote ID in exchange for any of the DAC’s proposed incentives. 

Hello Isabella I’m 107 certified and I’m looking forward to participate in the remote Id program.   Please send me more I formation on how to participate and drone requirements. 

I always enjoy your articles. 

Regards

Manuel

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As someone who has spent years testing electronics for companies, even to include DJI, I feel this will be a great step forward. I would like the opportunity to be apart of it. This could pave the way for drones to have better use of the airspace without the hassle.

Edited by Scott S.

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If it helps safety, doesn't cost much to do so and helps our business as part 107 pilots who use our sUAs for business, yes I'll take an active part. I have mine available for emergencies due to living on the Gulf Coast and must be able to give coverage to emergency services.

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Only in America can you have a bureaucracy do such a poor job of implementing the rules that they offer its constituents "certain privileges" for taking away their civil liberties. 

On 10/26/2019 at 9:50 AM, pb3 said:

ADS-B already meets the criteria and such a capability will allow drones to fully integrate into the national airspace system if/when necessary.

That's exactly right.  So can someone explain what problem this remote ID actually solves?  Does it make flying the drone safer?  No!  How does it help integrate UAVs into the NAS?  Why do those of you so quick to agree to this think there's not this kind of requirement for automobiles?  Or Airplanes? Or boats? Or even cell phones?  

And why should the DAC or anyone willing to sign up for this program think that entitles you to privileges that the other 107's who might not want to sign up for this program don't get?

Sorry, I realize this isn't going to be popular but this is exactly why the FAA has the NPRM process, so that it can't arbitrarily or capriciously promulgate unnecessary rules.

  

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In regards to participating in the Voluntary ID program.  As a part time Instructor and 107 Pilot, I would definitely appreciate the chance to help in the advancement of the UAV community whenever possible.

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