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So from the reading i have been doing this morning it looks as if the FAA is planning to release the finalized NPRM Part 107... On Tuesday the 21st of June. This means that tomorrow could very well change the landscape of the UAV industry in the united states. Here is one of the articles i have been perusing to find out more information:

http://www.suasnews.com/2016/06/part-107-drone-operators-need-know/

For those of you pending a 333, or waiting to see this could be a very exciting day that will help to lower your barrier of entry into the commercial UAV marketplace. Keep in mind this is still the federal government and the pace of implementation may be slow (several months or more). There is a lot to be done to set up new test and structure the licensure process. The nice thing is they have an infrastructure in place that already does digital tests for aeronautical knowledge, so this should help to speed up the process. 

If you are looking to do more than your typical sUAS operation (night flights, beyond VLOS, above 500 feet, over 55 lbs, there will still be a 333 exemption process for these more advanced operations. But most of your boiler plate operations and pre approved FAA blanket COA drones will be able to operate under the guidance and rules set forth in part 107. Cheers, and get ready to do some great flying!

 

 

cc @Alan Perlman

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12 hours ago, RemotelyPossible said:

So from the reading i have been doing this morning it looks as if the FAA is planning to release the finalized NPRM Part 107... On Tuesday the 21st of June. This means that tomorrow could very well change the landscape of the UAV industry in the united states. Here is one of the articles i have been perusing to find out more information:

http://www.suasnews.com/2016/06/part-107-drone-operators-need-know/

For those of you pending a 333, or waiting to see this could be a very exciting day that will help to lower your barrier of entry into the commercial UAV marketplace. Keep in mind this is still the federal government and the pace of implementation may be slow (several months or more). There is a lot to be done to set up new test and structure the licensure process. The nice thing is they have an infrastructure in place that already does digital tests for aeronautical knowledge, so this should help to speed up the process. 

If you are looking to do more than your typical sUAS operation (night flights, beyond VLOS, above 500 feet, over 55 lbs, there will still be a 333 exemption process for these more advanced operations. But most of your boiler plate operations and pre approved FAA blanket COA drones will be able to operate under the guidance and rules set forth in part 107. Cheers, and get ready to do some great flying!

 

 

cc @Alan Perlman

Great information! This is exactly what I am wantinh to do! My DJI Phantom 4 drone will be here this Thursday and I am egar to learn all I can!

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"Maximum altitude of 400 feet above ground level (AGL) or, if higher than 400 feet AGL, remain within 400 feet of a structure." 

Am I reading this right? Does this mean I can fly 400' above a 500' building?

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8 minutes ago, Silk Purse said:

"Maximum altitude of 400 feet above ground level (AGL) or, if higher than 400 feet AGL, remain within 400 feet of a structure." 

Am I reading this right? Does this mean I can fly 400' above a 500' building?

On a teleconference call with the FAA right now. This question was literally just asked. Yes...if a tower is 1200 ft. tall, as long as you stay within 400 ft of the tower, you can fly up there.

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I'm guessing they meant "horizontal separation" but screwed it up. I seriously doubt the FAA will permit UAS operations at 900 feet, too many other aircraft at/near that height.

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Just now, Uaviator53 said:

I'm guessing they meant "horizontal separation" but screwed it up. I seriously doubt the FAA will permit UAS operations at 900 feet, too many other aircraft at/near that height.

That's not what they just confirmed over the phone. They didn't screw anything up. They're not saying you can fly UAS at 900 feet. They're saying that you can fly within 400 feet of a structure that's taller than 400 feet. So you could inspect a 1200 foot tower as long as you stay within 400 feet of it at all times, horizontally and vertically.

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So, if I'm already a rated pilot does this mean I just submit proof of my 61 cert with the app and I'm blessed?

100mph, Wow..

Edited by hav3atps

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15 minutes ago, Alan Perlman said:

That's not what they just confirmed over the phone. They didn't screw anything up. They're not saying you can fly UAS at 900 feet. They're saying that you can fly within 400 feet of a structure that's taller than 400 feet. So you could inspect a 1200 foot tower as long as you stay within 400 feet of it at all times, horizontally and vertically.

Oh,  I see. Thanks. So the UAS can be at 1,600 feet over ground while inspecting that 1200 ft tower. As a manned aircraft pilot that, and 16 year olds flying commercially with only a written test and no one looking over their shoulder gives me heartburn. O.o

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5 minutes ago, Uaviator53 said:

Oh,  I see. Thanks. So the UAS can be at 1,600 feet over ground while inspecting that 1200 ft tower. As a manned aircraft pilot that, and 16 year olds flying commercially with only a written test and no one looking over their shoulder gives me heartburn. O.o

You and me both :)

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14 minutes ago, hav3atps said:

So, if I'm already a rated pilot does this mean I just submit proof of my 61 cert with the app and I'm blessed?

100mph, Wow..

If you're already a pilot, you can go to http://faasafety.gov to take a UAS course, and then come late August, when the rule is implemented, you'll be able to apply for Part 107 Remote Pilot Certificate (a UAS rating on your existing license) without having to take the Aeronautical Knowledge Test.

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5 minutes ago, hav3atps said:

The helicopter pilot community is already crawling out of their shorts.. A drone through the windshield at 100mph is a concern..

Yes, they are. Before I began 333 operations I contacted the local FSDO, the chief Airevac pilot in my area hospital and the one law enforcement agency operating a chopper in my area and coordinated with them (flight paths, radio frequencies, etc.). How many 16 yoa kids will do that? I sincerely hope all do, but I know better.

Edited by Uaviator53
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Any thoughts on what this means for the thousands of 333 waivers in the que? Mine was submitted in January and I'm sitting here trying to figure out my next move if any.  Thanks.

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1 hour ago, Todd Tamcsin said:

Any thoughts on what this means for the thousands of 333 waivers in the que? Mine was submitted in January and I'm sitting here trying to figure out my next move if any.  Thanks.

Hi @Todd Tamcsin, just answered that question in the FAQ section of this guide:

http://uavcoach.com/drone-certification

See below:

What if I have (or am waiting for) an FAA Section 333 Exemption?

Until Part 107 is implemented in late August 2016, the only way to operate a drone commercially in the U.S. is through a Section 333 exemption.

Here’s how the FAA describes what the 333 exemption is:

By law, any aircraft operation in the national airspace requires a certificated and registered aircraft, a licensed pilot, and operational approval. Section 333 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (FMRA) (PDF) grants the Secretary of Transportation the authority to determine whether an airworthiness certificate is required for a UAS to operate safely in the National Airspace System (NAS).

This authority is being leveraged to grant case-by-case authorization for certain unmanned aircraft to perform commercial operations prior to the finalization of the Small UAS Rule, which will be the primary method for authorizing small UAS operations once it is complete.

Given the new regulations announced on June 21st, 2016, we do not recommend this approach, and encourage those of you interested in becoming commercial drone pilots to start preparing to comply under Part 107.

But what if you already have a Section 333 Exemption, or you applied for one and are still waiting to receive yours?

You can read the FAA’s full position on Page 81 of the Part 107 ruling here.

Basically, if you already have a Section 333 Exemption, you can continue to operate under its provisions throughout the 24-month licensing window. You can choose to go through Part 107 separately if you’d like, which depending on what kind of operations you’re doing, will offer much less strict provisions.

If you applied for and are still waiting for a Section 333 Exemption, then you’re one of thousands of folks in the FAA’s backlog. The FAA breaks this backlog down into three areas:

  1. Section 333 Petitions where all the requirements that were asked for fall under Part 107. This represents the majority of the backlog.
  2. Section 333 Petitions that asked for provisions that fall outside of Part 107 but could be granted through the FAA’s new online waiver process. These waivers will automatically be granted to the petitioner if that’s the case.
  3. Section 333 Petitions that asked for provisions that fall outside of Part 107 AND the FAA’s new online waiver process. Like always, these petitions are reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

You should be notified in the next few weeks directly from the FAA which of the above tiers you fall into.

If you used a professional services company like Gowdy Brothers or Drone Law Pro to file your petition, you likely fall into the second or third category.

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2 hours ago, Alan Perlman said:

If you're already a pilot, you can go to http://faasafety.gov to take a UAS course, and then come late August, when the rule is implemented, you'll be able to apply for Part 107 Remote Pilot Certificate (a UAS rating on your existing license) without having to take the Aeronautical Knowledge Test.

Alan,

I navigated the page but couldn't find the UAS course. Did the feds tell you it's already posted?

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This is great news!! Did anyone see anything in there about any NOTAM requirement for commercial ops? I haven't had time yet to read thru the entire 624 page FAA document yet. 

Thanks, 

Chris 

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