wjules

Does size matter? ......with drones?

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Yes, that was meant tongue in cheek. I'm looking at the list of the Drones for Beginners Alan put together, and one or two other models not on the list to  learn some skills before really investing money. I'm realizing many of these are really tiny,  6" -  10" range.  So, wondering if these really simulate what flying a larger Phantom or more professional / commercial use drones would be like?  I've already learned from asking all of you questions that these will be more difficult to fly, but does the controllability of these super  small ones translate to the larger?  If the remotes are similar to use and reactions similar then it will be useful for me, as I've not flown RC's or been a big video game person.  $80 - $120 is still money and don't want to just waste it but I have decided I do want to good training tool with a camera to practice all facets before making a larger purchase. 

Also, is a "Digital' Controller different from other controllers, or in other words, is a digital controller the standard? would it still have 'joy' sticks (not sure the correct term here)  like I've seen on the few higher end DJI models I've seen?  

Last question, the first model on his list sounds popular, the  UDI U*I*A HD+ and have circular plastic around the propellers, guessing just propeller guards? Is this a useful this for rookie drone flyer?  And will the flight characteristics be very different than models without this?  Thanks it, thanks in advance for your help! 

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Well this was my experience. Yes flying the low priced drones are different in handling and capabilities than the higher priced drones. However big gotcha is learning on a higher priced drones is very costly.

I have started on the $50 to the $200. But the cost of learning is priceless. In one of Alan's courses he mentioned that it is not if but when you will crash.  

No matter how skilled you are it will happen. 

The $80-$120 is a good range for learning. One reason you want something strong and heavy enough to fly outside to experience weather conditions. But small enough so you still do indoor flights. The more practice the better. The other reason is when it crashes it would be cheaper to buy parts and to fix.

I have gone through $ in parts and more parts. But it helped in the long run , now I can fly the larger ones with more confidence. Also flight simulators you can use on you computer works pretty well also.

 

 

 

Edited by olesailor
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@wjules, my two cents would be to spend $30 on something like a Hubson X4 or similar, buy a few extra batteries and maybe a multi-battery charger and you will learn the basics very quickly. All of that costs a total of about $50 on Amazon. It's about the size of an average sized male hand, including fingers. :-)  It has two modes, normal and expert and the normal mode is very gentle and easy to handle. 

As I said before, you'll learn all the basic moves and gain a lot of confidence. Plus, its really fun!! 

I have flown several micro drones (i.e Phantoms) but I've just recently purchased one for myself. Learning on the smaller drones (nanos) has helped me tremendously.

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Thoughts: it really matters on where you plan to take your UAV experience. I am working towards a business path so I decided to go with a DJI P4. This is one of your more expensive drones but has a lot a versatility. It is a bigger drone and handles the outdoors very well. I use prop guards if flying indoors. I could have gone with smaller and cheaper but then as I progress with my business I would then have to buy more drones and accessories which means more dollars. 

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Hello @wjules

Does the controllability of these super  small ones translate to the larger? NO .

This is the unit I started with Cheerwing 4 Batteries Syma X5SW FPV Explorers2 2.4Ghz 4CH 6-Axis Gyro RC Headless Quadcopter Drone UFO with 0.3MP HD Wifi Camera.  Wound up buying two just for starting out and having a little fun getting it stuck in the trees, getting rained on and even snowed on while stuck in the trees for over a month.  I used to fly RC planes many years ago and wanted to get back into the swing.  I do think it would be best for you to start with anything $100.00 or less play around with it , see how you like it etc. , in case 1. you crash a lot or 2. you decide you do not want to fly one after all.  However if you do continue flying which by the way is a lot of fun and a profitable business.  You will find it much much easier to fly the larger ones after training on the small less expensive ones.  It comes down to , It's your money buy what you want.

The UDI ones you mentioned are also very good to start out with, these smaller ones are also much lighter and are not as steady in the wind as the more advanced ones.

Look around in your area to see if anyone knows of someone flying a drone and try to meet up with them to get a first hand look, maybe if you have a local hobby store close by that sells them, they should be able to find someone around your area to watch fly.

Jump in @wjules and start flying

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Thanks all for the comments! I finally just grabbed a small drone at Brookstone on my way through the airport this week.  Tomorrow I'll try and fly it.  Another question, I was going to purchase an iPad mini 4 just for travel purposes and thinking it would be useful when I upgrade to a larger drone.  To use for drone flying and the apps do I need the cellular service?  I was planning to just get an iPad mini without cellular service but will change that plan if the cellular will be useful for these apps. Thoughts? 

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I'm a DJI user, but I think most of the others are similar.  You don't need a cell connection for the DJI Go app, but GPS is very nice to have.  I'm also Android, but I think that non cellular iPads do not have GPS.  That could be a problem.  Some of the advanced apps like DroneDeply do make use of a mobile internet connection, but if  your phone has hotspot capability, you can use a non cellular android tablet connected through the hotspot and get everything you'll ever need.

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