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When you're putting together a video like this, you're telling a story.

If you were to self-critique, @GMillsNC...what would you say about how well this video helps you to tell your intended story / hit your goal of putting this together? If you were to shoot it again, what would you update / change if anything?

Alan

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Thanks for the intriguing question Alan. You’re quite the diplomat.

Yes, this video did not conform to any video producing best practices so the story was lost, if it ever had one. The subject was quite interesting though and perfect for UAV video. You may have gathered that, seen from the ground this outside artwork simply looked like crowd control fencing suspended on posts. As you could see from the air, at the right altitude, the right and left sides of the brain appear. People in my area of Raleigh NC were perplexed and frustrated by the piece because it’s difficult to relate to from the ground and there is no elevated position to view it– go figure.

My real goal as a newbie was putting more flight time in with my DJI P3A and randomly experimenting with video editing software. With your spur perhaps I’ll try again giving more thought to development, pre-production, production and post-production.

Thanks for taking the time to review and comment.

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Absolutely, and I appreciate you putting yourself out there and sharing this with us!

Yeah, before you take to the skies, a good thing to do is to map out what kind of shots you want to get. For this artwork, it would have been nice to see a birds-eye shot, an orbit to showcase the surrounding area, etc. Be very deliberate about your storyboarding, and bring your bird up into the air with a purpose. You've got 15 minutes to get 4 different shots, something like that. Think like the filmmaker that you're becoming. Over time, it'll become second nature.

But yeah, cool artwork. I can see how it would weird to view from the ground. Reminded me of a concert, or a parade or protest or something.

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Let me ask you a technical question. Since my P3A has the 2.7k camera I'm using MP4 with H264. The quality looks phenomenal to me. But what about FPS. My research suggest using higher FPS, like 60, for motion. SInce 99% of UAV video is motion oriented it stands to reason higher FPS is best. Is this your experience? Any times you suggest using lower fps like 24 or 30?

Looks like the DJI camera can support a lots of variables but mt Cyberlink Powerdirector editing s/w freaks out if the project is set for a different FPS than the clip. It seems I would need to stick to the same FPS per project - so much to learn :D

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27 minutes ago, Alan Perlman said:

I'll let @RemotelyPossible or @Christian Tucci hop in and comment here, but yes, I'd encourage you to shoot at higher FPS. It's often worth sacrificing not being able to shoot in 4K and to only shoot at 1080p if it means shooting at 60 FPS.

@GMillsNC Yes, agreed in general. It really all depends on what you are doing with your footage. 24fps is associated with film and film-like looks for your shots. 30fps is standard TV broadcast (29.97 actually...) and higher frame rates like 60fps and up can be used for more specialized filming. Most commonly, filming action sports or fast moving objects. This reduces motion blur. I would evaluate what you are trying to do with your footage and what the end project is and choose from there.

We talk a little about frame rates and the different options and editing with them in the Aerial Cinematography course on UAV Coach, launching this month! http://learn.uavcoach.com/courses/aerial-cinematography

Hope this helps,

Christian

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I have to say, if I shot this, it would be one long slow move. Starting at normal eye level (to show the barricades as viewed by someone walking by.) and then a slow climb up, with a simultaneous pan down. and maybe a slight move forward so you end with the barricades directly underneath your camera so you can see that it looks like a labyrinth/brain. When you shot it, you moved the aircraft, then moved the camera. You need to do those at the same time. 

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